Hyperion Records

Ave Maria
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Ave Maria has become Parsons’ most famous and well-loved motet since it was included in the Oxford Book of Tudor Anthems in 1978. Settings of the Ave Maria are not frequent in England—even William Byrd only set them as required by the liturgy in his two books of Gradualia (1605 and 1607) rather than as stand-alone pieces. Parsons simply sets the lines found in the Gospel of St Luke and has no invocation for the dead (authorized by Pope Pius V in 1568). This is a magical setting and it is not surprising that there is a beautiful ‘Amen’ coda. Initially the piece gives the impression of using a cantus firmus in the top part but it is in fact free-composed throughout. Parsons starts each medius phrase one note higher than the previous one, beginning on F and then moving up to D with long slow notes before reaching ‘benedicta tu’ when it joins the other voices in equal importance. Paul Doe has suggested that this piece might have been prompted by the early promise or subsequent plight of Mary, Queen of Scots. There is no direct evidence for this but it is not unreasonable to consider Parsons and indeed most of the mid-sixteenth-century writers—Sheppard, Tallis, White, Mundy and Tye—as Catholic sympathizers. They seem more free, more expressive, more expansive and more brave in their Latin compositions and it is tempting to speculate that in setting words from Psalms 15 and 119, the Lamentations and the Funeral Responds, they were consciously producing music with a Catholic slant. In comparison their English works tend to be shorter and less virtuosic and even the fledgling Great Services are short on excellent material, but then these mid-sixteenth-century composers were creating a new genre not previously explored and were probably writing to fulfil a set of rules which were not entirely clear. England had to wait for another generation—headed by William Byrd, Thomas Weelkes and Thomas Morley—before writing in English could achieve greatness.

from notes by Andrew Carwood © 2011

Track-specific metadata
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Details for CDA66994 track 15
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-97-99415
Duration
5'21
Recording date
26 June 1997
Recording venue
St Paul's Cathedral, London, United Kingdom
Recording producer
Arthur Johnson
Recording engineer
Julian Millard
Hyperion usage
  1. Advent at St Paul's (CDA66994)
    Disc 1 Track 15
    Release date: September 1997
    Deletion date: December 2011
    Superseded by CDH55463
  2. Advent at St Paul's (CDH55463)
    Disc 1 Track 15
    Release date: October 2012
    Helios (Hyperion's budget label)
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