Hyperion Records

Jeux d'eau
composer
November 1901; first performed by Ricardo Viñes on 5 April 1902

Recordings
'Eileen Joyce – The complete Parlophone & Columbia solo recordings' (APR7502)
Eileen Joyce – The complete Parlophone & Columbia solo recordings
APR7502  5CDs Download only  
'Ravel: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 1' (CKD290)
Ravel: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 1
CKD290  Download only  
'Ravel: The Complete Solo Piano Music' (CDA67341/2)
Ravel: The Complete Solo Piano Music
Buy by post £20.00 CDA67341/2  2CDs  
'Ravel: The Complete Solo Piano Music' (CDA67731/2)
Ravel: The Complete Solo Piano Music
Buy by post £20.00 CDA67731/2  2CDs  
'Walter Gieseking – The complete Homocord recordings and other rarities' (APR6013)
Walter Gieseking – The complete Homocord recordings and other rarities
APR6013  2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only  
Details
Track 2 on CDA67341/2 CD2 [5'42] 2CDs
Track 10 on CDA67731/2 CD2 [5'41] 2CDs
Track 1 on CKD290 [6'04] Download only
Track 17 on APR7502 CD4 [4'30] 5CDs Download only
Track 21 on APR6013 CD1 [3'56] 2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only

Jeux d'eau
EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Ravel marked himself out from most of his colleagues in his refusal to engage with Wagner—a great composer certainly, but dangerous as a model. Instead, he turned to Liszt, whom he regarded for one thing as a better orchestrator and, for another, as a piano composer on whom he could build. His Jeux d’eau, finished in November 1901 and premiered by Ricardo Viñes on 5 April the following year, obviously invites comparison with Liszt’s Les jeux d’eaux à la villa d’Este, and Ravel, asked how it should be played, answered ‘like Liszt, of course’. The epigraph, ‘Dieu fluvial riant de l’eau qui le chatouille’ (River god laughing at the water that tickles him), is taken from a poem by Henri de Régnier, who inscribed it on the earliest autograph of the piece: in fact the ‘Dieu’ of the quotation refers to the goddess Latona sitting naked on the back of a tortoise, as depicted on a fountain at Versailles. When the young pianist Henriette Faure played it to Ravel after the First World War, he complained: ‘Your fountains are sad ones.’ She repeated it, ‘thinking happy thoughts, so as to turn what I had previously thought was a meditation into a sparkling divertissement’. Ravel was content … and was quick to realize that he had found a new style of piano writing, to the point that he questioned the primacy in this area of Debussy, ‘who at the beginning of 1902 … had written only the three pieces Pour le piano [which], from the purely pianistic point of view, say nothing really new’.

from notes by Roger Nichols © 2011

Track-specific metadata
Click track numbers opposite to select

Details for CDA67731/2 disc 2 track 10
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-11-73210
Duration
5'41
Recording date
14 September 2010
Recording venue
Henry Wood Hall, London, United Kingdom
Recording producer
Andrew Keener
Recording engineer
David Hinitt
Hyperion usage
  1. Ravel: The Complete Solo Piano Music (CDA67731/2)
    Disc 2 Track 10
    Release date: March 2011
    2CDs
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