Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Sonata in F minor, Op 65 No 1

composer

 
In terms of organ music, Mendelssohn was the nineteenth century heir to the Lutheran tradition represented by Bach and did much to restore the position of the organ which had lost its dominant status particularly in Germany over the course of the previous century. As a boy and young man he travelled extensively in order to play the finest instruments of his day.

Bach’s legacy was of the greatest importance to Mendelssohn in all his music-making, but inescapably in his writing for organ. In a letter of July 1839 he urged his sister Fanny to ‘take a look at the C Major Fugue by Bach [BWV545]—I am so much in love with it, yesterday I played it to myself fifty times’.

His Six Sonatas for Organ, Op 65, are really collections of movements in related keys, and they do not follow the traditional sonata structure. They originated as 24 individual pieces composed between 1844 and 1845 and were assembled in response to a commission from the English publisher Coventry and Hollier, who suggested to Mendelssohn that he write some ‘Voluntaries’.

The first, in F minor, is the most varied; its opening movement presents a fugal texture, interspersed by statements of successive phrases of the Lutheran chorale ‘Was mein Gott will, das g’scheh’ allzeit’. A quiet adagio is reminiscent of his Songs without Words and the King’s musicologist Philip Radcliffe observed that the ‘recitative’ that followed ‘looked back to the early Piano Sonata in E and forward to certain things of César Franck’. It ends with an ‘exhilarating toccata-like’ finale.

from notes by Emma Cleobury © 2016

Recordings

The King of Instruments
Studio Master: KGS0020Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Mendelssohn: Music for organ
CDD220292CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)

Details

Movement 1: Allegro moderato e serioso
Track 5 on KGS0020 [5'27] Download only
Track 7 on CDD22029 CD1 [5'54] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Movement 2: Adagio
Track 6 on KGS0020 [3'01] Download only
Track 8 on CDD22029 CD1 [3'35] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Movement 3: Andante: Recitative
Track 7 on KGS0020 [2'50] Download only
Track 9 on CDD22029 CD1 [3'16] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Movement 4: Allegro assai vivace
Track 8 on KGS0020 [3'46] Download only
Track 10 on CDD22029 CD1 [3'38] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)

Track-specific metadata for CDA66491/2 disc 1 track 8

Adagio
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-92-49108
Duration
3'35
Recording date
14 November 1990
Recording venue
St Paul's Cathedral, London, United Kingdom
Recording producer
Mark Brown
Recording engineer
Antony Howell
Hyperion usage
  1. Mendelssohn: Organ Music (CDA66491/2)
    Disc 1 Track 8
    Release date: March 1992
    Deletion date: September 1997
    2CDs Superseded by CDD22029
  2. Mendelssohn: Music for organ (CDD22029)
    Disc 1 Track 8
    Release date: September 1997
    2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...