Hyperion Records

Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas
composer
6vv; Festal Mass
author of text
Ordinary of the Mass

Recordings
'Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas' (CDGIM004)
Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas
Buy by post £11.75 CDGIM004 
'Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas & other sacred music' (CDH55052)
Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas & other sacred music
Buy by post £5.50 CDH55052  Helios (Hyperion's budget label)  
'Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas' (CDGIM045)
Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas
Buy by post £11.75 CDGIM045  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Sixteen & The Golden Age of Polyphony' (CDS44401/10)
The Sixteen & The Golden Age of Polyphony
Buy by post £38.50 CDS44401/10  10CDs Boxed set (at a special price)  
'Renaissance Radio' (CDGIM212)
Renaissance Radio
Buy by post £11.75 CDGIM212  2CDs for the price of 1  
Details
Movement 1: Gloria
Movement 2: Credo
Movement 3: Sanctus and Benedictus
Movement 3b: Benedictus
Movement 4: Agnus Dei

Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas
EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Gloria tibi Trinitas is deservedly the best-known of Taverner’s three large-scale festal masses and took pride of place as the first item to be copied into the so-called Forrest-Heyther part-books, thought to have been compiled for use at Cardinal College during Taverner’s tenure of office. Its title is derived from the plainchant cantus firmus ‘Gloria tibi Trinitas’, one of the antiphons for Trinity Sunday and doubly appropriate in view of the College’s dedication to the Trinity. Scored for six-part choir with the high trebles so characteristic of English music of this period, the Mass is a masterpiece of finely balanced construction. Its cantus firmus, assigned to the mean part, is stated three times in each movement, in progressive rhythmic diminution. (The one exception to this pattern occurs in the Agnus Dei, where the expected second statement of the chant is omitted in favour of a freely composed passage of poignant serenity.) As was customary in English festal masses of this period, the Kyrie was not set to polyphony because it would have been sung to troped chant. The four constituent movements, broadly similar in length and outline, are linked by a common head motif. Within each one, variety of texture is brought about through the contrast between sonorous passages for full choir (invariably incorporating cantus firmus) and more delicately scored verses, often more imitative in conception.

The unusual grace that characterizes the section of the Benedictus beginning at ‘In nomine Domini’ was evidently recognized by contemporary musicians, several of whom included it in their anthologies of favourite extracts. Not only was it arranged for a variety of vocal and instrumental ensembles, but it also provided the inspiration for a new genre of major importance. Known as the ‘In nomine’, this instrumental form was distinguished by its cantus firmus, the ‘Gloria tibi Trinitas’ plainchant, and it was widely cultivated by English composers up to the end of the seventeenth century.

from notes by Sally Dunkley © 2000

Track-specific metadata
Click track numbers opposite to select

Details for CDS44401/10 disc 4 track 2
Movement 2: Credo
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-87-13402
Duration
10'17
Recording date
17 March 1984
Recording venue
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Recording producer
Mark Brown
Recording engineer
Antony Howell
Hyperion usage
  1. Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas & other sacred music (CDA66134)
    Disc 1 Track 2
    Release date: September 1987
    Deletion date: April 2000
    Superseded by CDH55052
  2. Taverner: Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas & other sacred music (CDH55052)
    Disc 1 Track 2
    Release date: April 2000
    Helios (Hyperion's budget label)
  3. The Sixteen & The Golden Age of Polyphony (CDS44401/10)
    Disc 4 Track 2
    Release date: November 2009
    10CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
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