Hyperion Records

Lieder ohne Worte I, Op 19b
composer
1832

Recordings
'Mendelssohn: Songs without words' (CDD22020)
Mendelssohn: Songs without words
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 CDD22020  2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)  
'Mendelssohn: The Complete Solo Piano Music, Vol. 1' (CDA67935)
Mendelssohn: The Complete Solo Piano Music, Vol. 1
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £12.00ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £12.00 CDA67935  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'Mendelssohn: Valerie Tryon plays Mendelssohn' (APR5595)
Mendelssohn: Valerie Tryon plays Mendelssohn
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99 APR5595  Download only  
'Paderewski – His earliest recordings' (APR6006)
Paderewski – His earliest recordings
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99 APR6006  2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only  
'Jorge Bolet – His earliest recordings' (APR6009)
Jorge Bolet – His earliest recordings
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99 APR6009  2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only  
'The Piano G & Ts, Vol. 1 – Vladimir de Pachmann, Aleksander Michalowski & Landon Ronald' (APR5531)
The Piano G & Ts, Vol. 1 – Vladimir de Pachmann, Aleksander Michalowski & Landon Ronald
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99 APR5531  Download only  
'The Piano G & Ts, Vol. 4 – Diémer, Eibenschütz, Hofmann & Backhaus' (APR5534)
The Piano G & Ts, Vol. 4 – Diémer, Eibenschütz, Hofmann & Backhaus
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99 APR5534  Download only  
Details
No 1 in E major: Andante con moto
Track 13 on CDA67935 [3'27]
Track 1 on CDD22020 CD1 [3'44] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Track 3 on APR5595 [3'22] Download only
No 2 in A minor: Andante espressivo
Track 14 on CDA67935 [2'33]
Track 2 on CDD22020 CD1 [2'06] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Track 4 on APR5595 [2'02] Download only
No 3 in A major: Molto allegro e vivace
Track 15 on CDA67935 [2'29]
Track 3 on CDD22020 CD1 [2'52] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Track 5 on APR5595 [2'17] Download only
Track 13 on APR5534 [2'09] Download only
Track 16 on APR6006 CD1 [2'27] 2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only
Track 20 on APR6006 CD2 [2'27] 2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only
Track 3 on APR6009 CD1 [2'20] 2CDs for the price of 1 — Download only
Track 20 on APR5531 [2'05] Download only
No 4 in A major: Moderato
Track 16 on CDA67935 [2'02]
Track 4 on CDD22020 CD1 [1'55] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
No 5 in F sharp minor: Poco agitato
Track 17 on CDA67935 [3'37]
Track 5 on CDD22020 CD1 [3'01] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
No 6 in G minor 'Venetianisches Gondellied': Andante sostenuto
Track 18 on CDA67935 [2'56]
Track 6 on CDD22020 CD1 [1'58] 2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)

Lieder ohne Worte I, Op 19b
EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Mendelssohn is inextricably associated with the genre of the Lied ohne Worte, described by Schumann as an art song abstracted for the piano, with its text deleted. The origins of this new genre are shrouded in some mystery, but it may trace its source to a childhood game the composer played with his elder sister, Fanny—the second child prodigy in the Mendelssohn family—in which the two composed piano pieces and then added texts to them. Mendelssohn’s first datable Lied ohne Worte, written for Fanny, is from 1828, but not until a few years later, in 1832, did he hit upon the idea of publishing a set of piano Lieder as a counterpart to a set of songs. Both were assigned the opus number 19, though today they are distinguished as Op 19a (Sechs Gesänge) and Op 19b (Sechs Lieder ohne Worte).

The six pieces of Op 19b offer keyboard simulations of three vocal types, the solo Lied (Nos 1 and 2), with a treble cantilena supported by an accompaniment below; duet (No 6), in which the melodic line is doubled in thirds or sixths; and part-song (Nos 3 and 4), featuring homophonic textures in chordal style. Two pieces (Nos 3 and 5) are of sufficient length to unfold in miniature sonata forms. The composer left every piece but the last untitled, though No 3, with its pursuing imitative lines and echoing horn calls, impresses as a Jagdlied (‘hunting song’), and No 4, which shares its key and some thematic material with No 3, as a Jägerlied (‘hunters’ song’). The muted No 6, the Venetianisches Gondellied, was the first of several that Mendelssohn composed and so titled, and was inspired by his visit to Venice in 1830. Its blurry pedal effects and gently undulating cross-rhythms magically conjure up the romantic allure of the Venetian lagoons.

Mendelssohn issued Op 19b and subsequent sets of Lieder ohne Worte in parallel German, French and English editions. In Paris the pieces first appeared as Romances sans paroles, and in England as Original Melodies for the Piano. The composer never used the now prevalent translation Songs without Words, nor did he authorize other descriptive titles fitted to the pieces in later editions, for example ‘Sweet Remembrance’ (No 1), ‘Regrets’ (No 2), and ‘Restlessness’ (No 5). Largely the whims of publishers, these accretions ran counter to Mendelssohn’s own aesthetic, to let the individual Lieder stand by themselves, and to trust the precision of musical expression over the ambiguities of words.

from notes by R Larry Todd © 2013

Track-specific metadata
Click track numbers opposite to select

Details for CDD22020 disc 1 track 4
No 4 in A major: Moderato
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-86-22104
Duration
1'55
Recording date
20 April 1986
Recording venue
Seldon Hall, Haberdashers' Aske's School, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Recording producer
Martin Compton
Recording engineer
Antony Howell
Hyperion usage
  1. Mendelssohn: Songs without words (CDA66221/2)
    Disc 1 Track 4
    Release date: October 1987
    Deletion date: March 1997
    2CDs Superseded by CDD22020
  2. Mendelssohn: Songs without words (CDD22020)
    Disc 1 Track 4
    Release date: March 1997
    2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
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