Hyperion Records

Romance, Op 62
composer

Recordings
'L'Après Midi d'un Dinosaur' (CDH88035)
L'Après Midi d'un Dinosaur
Buy by post £13.99 (ARCHIVE SERVICE) CDH88035  Helios (Hyperion's budget label) — Archive Service   Download currently discounted
'The Playful Pachyderm' (CDA67453)
The Playful Pachyderm
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67453  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Details
Track 2 on CDA67453 [5'29]
Track 5 on CDH88035 [5'25] Helios (Hyperion's budget label) — Archive Service

Romance, Op 62
Composed in 1910, Edward Elgar’s short Romance Op 62 came from one of his most prolific and richly creative periods, sandwiched between the First Symphony (1908) and the Second Symphony (1911), written in the same year as the Violin Concerto. Yet, the work has links with the composer’s humble beginnings as a young musician in Worcester, when he played the violin in local orchestras, conducted the Glee Club, and played the bassoon in a wind quintet with two flutes and no horn, also composing a number of works for this unusual combination. His love for and understanding of the bassoon is evident in all his major orchestral works, and it was the playing of his friend Edwin F James (principal bassoonist in the London Symphony Orchestra) that inspired Elgar to compose this lyrical, somewhat reflective work. The majority of the Romance was written on 11 January 1910 when Elgar was busy working on sketches for his Violin Concerto, and comparisons between the opening tuttis and solo entries of both works reveal a striking similarity of ideas. It was first performed by James in a Herefordshire Orchestral Society concert conducted by the composer on 16 February 1911. The rather melancholy character of the Romance may well be a reflection of Elgar’s sadness following the recent deaths of two close friends whom the composer immortalized in his ‘Enigma’ Variations – A J Jaeger (the dedicatee of Variation 9, ‘Nimrod’) and Basil G Nevison (Variation 12, ‘B.G.N.’). Beautifully written for the instrument, with a sensitive and imaginative accompaniment, this is undoubtably one of the great miniature masterpieces for the solo bassoon.

from notes by Laurence Perkins © 2004

Track-specific metadata
Click track numbers opposite to select

Details for CDH88035 track 5
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-82-03505
Duration
5'25
Recording date
30 December 1981
Recording venue
Recording producer
Andrew Keener
Recording engineer
Antony Howell
Hyperion usage
  1. L'Après Midi d'un Dinosaur (CDH88035)
    Disc 1 Track 5
    Release date: July 1989
    Helios (Hyperion's budget label) — Archive Service
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