Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

The well-tempered Clavier Book 2, BWV870-893

composer
early 1740s

 
Bach may well have thought he had finished The Well-Tempered Clavier on completing the manuscript of Book 1 in 1722. In the event, that same collection went through various stages of revision and, while he was still revising this in the early 1740s, he compiled a second set of pieces, which had doubtlessly arisen out of his teaching and performing over the intervening decades. It would be a mistake to suggest that this is a mere ‘overflow’ from the earlier collection. Many of the pieces went through a long gestation and Bach transposed a number to fit the sequence of keys in the new collection. In all, it represents the largest and most varied collection of his later years and reflects Bach’s increasing interest in the breadth of music history as he saw it, ranging from pieces harking back to the severe contrapuntal restrictions of the late sixteenth century (the so-called stile antico) and those in the most modern galant idiom (some of which display the characteristics of the fledgling sonata form).

While an autograph of most of the preludes and fugues in The Well-Tempered Clavier Book II survives (in the British Library, one of the finest Bach manuscripts outside Germany) this does not present every pair in its most finished state. Rather it represents a relatively long process of compilation stretching from c1738 to 1742, one that was subsequently continued in later copies and (lost) autographs. Like the first volume of The Well-Tempered Clavier, there is a sense in which the work as a whole is open-ended and that Bach found it difficult to stop refining his work.

Several features of the London autograph are striking: it is laid out in large double-size sheets which accommodate the prelude on one side and the fugue on the other. This suggests that this manuscript (really a collection of individual sheets) was designed specifically to facilitate performance, so that the performer had only to turn the page between each prelude and fugue. Another notable feature of the manuscript is the fact that some pieces are written out by Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena. Sometimes (e.g. the F major Prelude), Bach takes over the copying half-way through, perhaps because her calligraphy was too broad to complete the piece on the same side of the sheet. More often than not, Bach seems to have delegated the copying of pieces that required the least compositional attention, those that he considered most finished in their basic structure (although he added details and revisions in his own hand). This gives a fascinating insight into the way Bach notated and copied some of his music: the husband-and-wife team often produced manuscripts as master copies, or even for sale (as in Anna Magdalena’s score of the violoncello suites), a sort of cottage-industry which allowed Bach to prioritize his work according to the degree of input required.

Perhaps the most interesting pieces with respect to the development of Bach’s composing career are the ten preludes cast in ‘binary form’ (i.e. in two halves, each of which can be repeated). While he had written binary pieces since his earliest years, most of these were dances with more-or-less predictable phrasing and rhythms appropriate to each type of dance. Less common in his earlier career was the concept of a ‘free’ (i.e. non-dance) texture in binary form: The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I contained only one such piece. But by the time he came to compile Book II his sons were already catching on to the newer idiom. Typically, the older Bach not only adopted the new format with gusto but also managed to demonstrate considerable variety in the form, as if he had been doing it for years. Some examples follow Bach’s typical ‘invention’ style, where the two hands constantly alternate with matching figuration (C minor, D sharp minor, E minor). The E major Prelude presents perhaps the most subtle texture of the binary movements; written largely in three voices, we sometimes hear the upper voices as a single line with certain notes sustained and, conversely, each voice sometimes implying more than one line of music. Herein lies the essence of Bach’s ‘cantabile’ style, a sure sense of direction or ‘line’ that cannot necessarily be pinned down to a single melody; perhaps this is what Debussy alluded to as Bach’s sense of the ‘Arabesque’.

The most ambitious binary prelude is that in D major, which presents a concerto-like—almost orchestral—texture, a ‘recapitulation’ of the opening in the last third of the piece, and a contrast of mood within the very first bars. This latter, not uncommon in Bach’s later pieces, represents a modification of the traditional Baroque idiom of exploring a single affect exhaustively in the course of each movement. The preludes in F minor and G sharp minor are among the most ‘modern’ pieces Bach ever composed (in the sense of being up-to-date within the tastes of Bach’s later years). The texture is simple, paired ‘sighing’ voices responding to a regular bass, alternating with repetitive motivic patterns. Here we have an even more overt sense of alternation of ideas (one reinforced by dynamic markings in the G sharp minor Prelude—a unique occurrence in the entire Well-Tempered Clavier). But—typically—Bach integrates these in the course of the piece, his urge for counterpoint working in the sense of combining various styles and allusions as well as actual musical lines. We could imagine the ambiguous reaction of a modish galant composer of Bach’s time: one might feel flattered by the old composer’s adoption of the new fashion; but was he perhaps sending it up? Or did he fundamentally miss its essence of airy simplicity? Or, perhaps worst of all, did he simply not care what anyone thought?

The interest in The Well-Tempered Clavier Book II lies hardly exclusively in its ‘sonata’ movements: from the very opening we get a sense that Bach was trying to encompass even more variety, to write on a grander scale, than he had in Book I. The C major pair went through several revisions, showing Bach attempting to increase the scale of the piece and extend the depth of musical argument. The Prelude, like its partner in the first collection, makes a striking opening, adopting a mood of untroubled confidence: yet here the writing is more ambitious, the part-writing more delineated. A similarly rich sonority occurs in the F major Prelude, which combines old-fashioned features—a four- or five-part texture, and the stile brisé of French harpsichord music—with the modern sonata and its recapitulation of the opening gestures. The arpeggiated ‘beginner’s style’ makes only the occasional appearance in the later collection. But the first example, the C sharp major Prelude, contains a surprise, when the texture breaks into a short, triple-time fughetta. These two parts originally formed a prelude and fugue in their own right, but in the context of the grander proportions of The Well-Tempered Clavier as a whole, they form a single prelude. The brilliant fingerwork of Bach’s youth also returns in the later collection: the D minor Prelude was one that Bach lengthened and elaborated in the course of compiling the collection. In direct contrast, Bach also adopts a lilting pastorale style in some preludes: the Preludes in C sharp minor and E flat major (in the relatively rare metre of 9/8), and the Prelude in A major.

The fugues, like the preludes, extend the variety already evident in the first collection. While there are fewer fugues in a large number of voices (three parts is more the norm), many of the fugues match the scale and complexity of those in Bach’s late contrapuntal collections (the early version of the Art of Fugue was actually being prepared at around the time Bach was finishing The Well-Tempered Clavier Book II). The subjects on which the fugues are based are often very characterful (e.g. the F major Fugue), and sometimes ‘modern’ in their contrast of motifs: the D minor Fugue couples easy-going triplet motion with a descending chromatic phrase (thus presenting an antithesis of moods in its opening gesture); likewise, the E minor Fugue presents a contrast of triplets with duple divisions and dotted rhythms. The A minor Fugue opens with a gesture that was common property in the eighteenth century (e.g. ‘And with his stripes’ from Handel’s Messiah and the ‘Kyrie’ from Mozart’s Requiem), yet Bach develops it in a way that would have been impossible in a choral setting: building on the intensification of movement in the subject, the countersubject introduces demisemiquavers that render this one of the most fiery pieces in the collection. Most enterprising in terms of compositional effort are the double and triple fugues (i.e. fugues which present more than one subject in succession, only to combine them later in the piece). In the C sharp minor Fugue we soon hear the subject presented in mirror inversion (usually more than enough to demonstrate a composer’s skill), but later on what sounds like a chromatic countermelody becomes a subject in its own right, one that effortlessly combines with the main subject. The F sharp minor Fugue presents the only triple-fugue in Book II; here the later subjects give the impression of increasingly light musical styles, until the entire texture is transformed by the continuous semiquavers of the third subject. What begins as a relatively solemn piece in ‘learned’ style thus progressively gains a narrative and dramatic character.

One particularly satisfying device in the fugues of Book II is augmentation, where we hear a subject sounding against itself at half speed: in the C minor Fugue it is readily audible, as if to remind us of the correspondences between different levels in the natural world, or in mathematics. Indeed, the more conservative thought of Bach’s age would have seen resemblances between things that we might consider quite distinct; part of fugal technique lay in developing and manipulating music in order to reveal these resemblances. Bach doubtless considered much of his compositional activity to be more a process of discovery than of entirely original invention.

Most strict of all in its adherence to quasi-Renaissance rules is the E major Fugue (Bach—ever the student—actually acquired Fux’s contrapuntal treatise in the late 1720s). This ‘late’ adoption of an ‘early’ idiom generates a sonorous, supremely vocal style that seems to transcend the qualities of any keyboard instrument. But by no means all the fugues capitalize on the seriousness connected with the genre: the C sharp major Fugue is an extremely light-hearted affair that seems almost to parody the technique of overlapping successive entries of the (brief and seemingly inconsequential) subject. Comedy and light-heartedness also play a large part in the F major Fugue, which, as Donald Francis Tovey observed, became the bane of textbook writers since it fulfills so few of the requirements demanded by ‘academic’ fugue. Other fugues, such as those in F minor and F sharp major adopt some of the sighing gestures of the galant, that idiom which was perhaps most antithetical to fugue in the 1740s. To Bach this was probably a demonstration that even the trivial and transitory can be rendered profound; to many of his contemporaries this would have been a lamentable show of bad taste, a total perversion of the ‘natural’.

from notes by John Butt © 2009

En achevant le manuscrit de 1722, Bach a peut-être pensé qu’il avait terminé le Clavier bien tempéré. En l’occurrence, ce même recueil a connu plusieurs phases de révision et, alors qu’il était encore en train de le réviser au début des années 1740, il a compilé un second recueil de pièces, synthèse probable de son enseignement et de ses exécutions au cours des décennies qui venaient de s’écouler. Laisser entendre que ce recueil est un simple «trop-plein» du recueil antérieur serait une erreur. Plusieurs pièces ont connu une longue gestation et Bach en a transposé certaines pour qu’elles correspondent à la séquence de tonalités du nouveau recueil. Ensemble, elles constituent les recueils les plus importants et les plus variés de la fin de sa vie, et reflètent l’intérêt sans cesse croissant de Bach pour l’étendue de l’histoire de la musique telle qu’il la voyait, des pièces évoquant les restrictions contrapuntiques sévères de la fin du XVIe siècle (le stile antico) à celles composées dans le langage «galant» plus moderne (dont certaines présentent les caractéristiques de la forme sonate naissante).

Si une partition autographe de la plupart des préludes et fugues du Livre II du Clavier bien tempéré nous est parvenue (conservée à la British Library, l’un des plus beaux manuscrits de Bach hors d’Allemagne), chaque paire n’y figure pas sous son état le plus fini. Cet autographe représente plutôt un processus de compilation relativement long qui s’étend des environs de 1738 à 1742 et qui s’est ensuite poursuivi dans des exemplaires ultérieurs et dans des autographes (perdus). Comme pour le premier volume du Clavier bien tempéré, on a l’impression que l’ouvrage dans son ensemble est ouvert et que Bach n’est pas parvenu à cesser de peaufiner son travail.

L’autographe londonien comporte plusieurs caractéristiques frappantes: il se présente en grandes feuilles doubles avec le prélude d’un côté et la fugue de l’autre, ce qui laisse supposer que ce manuscrit (en réalité un recueil de feuilles séparées) a été spécifiquement conçu pour faciliter l’exécution, afin que l’instrumentiste n’ait à tourner la page qu’entre chaque prélude et fugue. Le manuscrit possède une autre caractéristique importante: certaines pièces sont écrites de la main de la seconde femme de Bach, Anna Magdalena. Parfois (par exemple pour le Prélude en fa majeur), Bach reprend la copie au milieu, peut-être parce que la calligraphie de son épouse était trop large pour terminer la pièce sur le même côté de la feuille. Le plus souvent, Bach semble avoir délégué la copie des pièces qui nécessitaient le moins d’attention en matière de composition, celles qu’il jugeait plus finies dans leur structure fondamentale (bien qu’il ait ajouté des détails et des révisions de sa main). Cela donne un aperçu passionnant de la façon dont Bach notait et copiait certaines de ses œuvres: le couple réalisait souvent des manuscrits considérés comme des originaux, ou même pour la vente (comme la partition d’Anna Magdalena des suites pour violoncelle), une sorte d’activité artisanale à domicile qui permettait à Bach de donner des priorités à son travail selon le degré d’effort requis.

Les pièces les plus intéressantes, si l’on se place dans l’optique de l’évolution de la carrière de Bach en matière de composition, sont sans doute les dix préludes de «forme binaire» (c’est-à-dire en deux moitiés, dont chacune peut faire l’objet d’une reprise). Il avait écrit des pièces binaires depuis sa jeunesse, mais c’était pour la plupart des danses avec un phrasé plus ou moins prévisible et des rythmes appropriés à chaque type de danse. Au début de sa carrière, le concept d’une texture «libre» (c’est-à-dire qui ne soit pas une danse) de forme binaire était moins courant: le Livre I du Clavier bien tempéré ne contenait qu’une seule pièce de ce genre. Mais lorsqu’il en est arrivé à compiler le Livre II, ses fils appréhendaient déjà le langage plus nouveau. Comme à son habitude, le vieux Bach a non seulement adopté la nouveauté avec enthousiasme, mais il est aussi parvenu à faire preuve d’une variété considérable dans la forme, comme s’il l’avait fait depuis des années. Certains exemples suivent le style de l’«invention» typique de Bach, où les deux mains alternent constamment avec une figuration assortie (ut mineur, ré dièse mineur, mi mineur). Le Prélude en mi majeur présente peut-être la texture de mouvements binaires la plus subtile; écrit largement à trois voix, on entend parfois les voix supérieures comme une seule ligne avec certaines notes tenues et, à l’inverse, chaque voix semble impliquer parfois plusieurs lignes de musique. Là réside l’essence du style «cantabile» de Bach, un sens sûr de la direction ou une «ligne» qui ne peut forcément s’identifier à une seule mélodie; c’est peut-être ce à quoi Debussy faisait allusion lorsqu’il parlait du sens de «l’arabesque» chez Bach.

Le prélude binaire le plus ambitieux est celui en ré majeur, qui présente une texture concertante—presque orchestrale—, une «réexposition» du début dans le dernier tiers de la pièce, et un contraste d’atmosphère au sein des toutes premières mesures. Ce contraste, qui n’est pas rare dans les dernières œuvres de Bach, représente une modification du langage baroque traditionnel qui n’explorait qu’une seule émotion, de manière exhaustive, au cours de chaque mouvement. Les préludes en fa mineur et en sol dièse mineur comptent parmi les pièces les plus «modernes» que Bach ait jamais composées (en ce qu’elles correspondent aux goûts à la mode des dernières années de sa vie). La texture est simple, des voix «soupirantes» appariées répondant à une basse régulière, alternant avec des motifs répétitifs. On a ici une impression encore plus manifeste d’une alternance d’idées (impression renforcée par des indications de dynamique dans le Prélude en sol dièse mineur—cas unique dans tout le Clavier bien tempéré). Mais—comme à son habitude—Bach intègre ces idées au cours de la pièce, son désir de contrepoint le poussant à combiner divers styles et allusions ainsi que des lignes musicales réelles. On peut imaginer la réaction ambiguë d’un compositeur «galant» à la mode du temps de Bach: il aurait pu se sentir flatté que le vieux compositeur adopte la nouvelle mode; mais n’en aurait-il pas fait une parodie? ou est-ce que la simplicité insouciante par essence de cette mode lui faisait fondamentalement défaut? ou, peut-être pire encore, se serait-il tout simplement moqué de ce que pensaient les autres?

L’intérêt du Livre II du Clavier bien tempéré ne réside pas exclusivement dans ses mouvements de «sonate»: d’emblée, on a l’impression que Bach cherche à englober une diversité encore plus grande, à écrire à plus grande échelle que dans le Livre I. Le Prélude et Fugue en ut majeur a subi plusieurs révisions, montrant comment Bach a essayé d’augmenter l’envergure de la pièce et d’approfondir la profondeur de l’argument musical. Le Prélude, comme son homologue dans le premier recueil, offre un début saisissant, adoptant un air de confiance sereine: pourtant l’écriture y est plus ambitieuse, la conduite des voix plus déterminée. On trouve une sonorité aussi riche dans le Prélude en fa majeur, qui allie des éléments démodés—une texture à quatre ou cinq voix, et le «style brisé» de la musique de clavecin française—à la sonate moderne et à sa réexposition des gestes initiaux. Le style arpégé du «débutant» n’apparaît qu’occasionnellement dans le second recueil. Mais le premier exemple, le Prélude en ut dièse majeur, comporte une surprise, lorsque la texture se brise en une courte fughetta à trois temps. Ces deux parties constituaient à l’origine un prélude et fugue à part entière, mais dans le contexte des proportions élargies du Clavier bien tempéré dans son ensemble, elles forment un seul prélude. Le brillant travail des doigts de la jeunesse de Bach revient aussi dans le second recueil: le Prélude en ré mineur en est un exemple que Bach a rallongé et élaboré pendant qu’il compilait ce recueil. En contraste direct, Bach adopte également un style pastoral mélodieux dans certains préludes: les préludes en ut dièse mineur et en mi bémol majeur (un mètre à 9/8 ce qui est relativement rare) et le Prélude en la majeur.

Les fugues, comme les préludes, accroissent la variété déjà manifeste du premier recueil. Il y a moins de fugues à un grand nombre de voix (trois parties est davantage la norme), mais nombre d’entre elles égalent l’envergure et la complexité de celles qui figurent dans les recueils contrapuntiques tardifs de Bach (la première version de l’Art de la fugue date en fait à peu près de l’époque où Bach terminait le Livre II du Clavier bien tempéré). Les sujets sur lesquels reposent les fugues ont souvent beaucoup de caractère (notamment la Fugue en fa majeur) et ils sont parfois «modernes» dans le contraste de leurs motifs: la Fugue en ré mineur ajoute un mouvement souple en triolets à une phrase chromatique descendante (présentant ainsi une antithèse d’atmosphères dans son geste initial); de même, la Fugue en mi mineur offre un contraste entre les triolets d’un côté, et les doubles divisions binaires et les rythmes pointés d’un autre. La Fugue en la mineur commence par un geste courant au XVIIIe siècle (comme «And with his stripes» du Messie de Haendel et le «Kyrie» du Requiem de Mozart), mais Bach le développe d’une manière impossible à adopter dans le domaine de la musique chorale: en se fondant sur l’intensification du mouvement dans le sujet, le contre-sujet introduit des triples croches qui font de cette pièce l’une des plus enflammées du recueil. Les plus audacieuses en matière de composition sont les doubles et triples fugues (c’est-à-dire les fugues qui présentent plusieurs sujets à la suite les uns des autres pour les combiner ensuite dans la pièce). Dans la Fugue en ut dièse mineur, on entend vite le sujet présenté en miroir (en général, c’est largement assez pour démontrer la compétence d’un compositeur), mais par la suite, sur ce qui ressemble à un contresujet chromatique, il devient un sujet à part entière, un sujet qui s’allie sans peine au sujet principal. La Fugue en fa dièse mineur est la seule triple fugue du Livre II: ici, les derniers sujets semblent relever de styles musicaux de plus en plus légers, jusqu’à ce que les doubles croches continues du troisième sujet transforment l’ensemble de la texture. Ce qui commence comme une pièce relativement solennelle dans un style «savant» se pare ainsi progressivement d’un caractère narratif et dramatique.

Dans les fugues du Livre II, un procédé s’avère particulièrement convaincant: c’est l’augmentation, où l’on entend un sujet sonner contre lui-même deux fois moins vite; dans la Fugue en ut mineur, il est facile à percevoir, comme pour nous rappeler les correspondances entre différents niveaux dans le monde naturel ou en mathématique. En fait, la pensée plus conservatrice de l’époque de Bach aurait vu des ressemblances entre des choses que nous pourrions juger très distinctes; une partie de la technique de la fugue consiste à développer et manipuler la musique afin de révéler ces ressemblances. Bach considérait certainement qu’une grande partie de ses activités de compositeur étaient davantage un processus de découverte que d’invention entièrement originale.

La Fugue en mi majeur est la plus stricte, ou presque, de toutes dans son adhésion aux règles de la Renaissance (Bach—l’éternel étudiant n’a en fait acquis le traité contrapuntique de Fux qu’à la fin des années 1720). Cette adoption «tardive» d’un langage «ancien» engendre un style sonore, suprêmement vocal qui semble transcender les qualités de tout instrument à clavier. Mais toutes les fugues sont loin de tirer parti du sérieux lié au genre: la Fugue en ut dièse majeur est une pièce très enjouée qui semble presque parodier la technique consistant à recouvrir les entrées successives du sujet (bref et apparemment sans importance). La comédie et l’humour jouent aussi un grand rôle dans la Fugue en fa majeur qui, comme l’a remarqué Donald Francis Tovey, est devenue le fléau des auteurs de manuels car elle répond si peu aux exigences de la fugue «académique». D’autres fugues, comme celles en fa mineur et en fa dièse majeur adoptent quelques gestes soupirants du style «galant», le langage qui allait le plus à l’encontre de la fugue dans les années 1740. Pour Bach, c’est peut-être la preuve que même l’insignifiant et l’éphémère peuvent devenir profonds; un grand nombre de ses contemporains ont dû y voir un lamentable étalage de mauvais goût, une perversion totale du «naturel».

extrait des notes rédigées par John Butt © 2009
Français: Marie-Stella Pâris

Es kann gut sein, dass Bach zunächst glaubte, das Wohltemperierte Klavier mit der Fertigstellung des Manuskripts 1722 vollendet zu haben. Der Zyklus wurde jedoch mehrmals umgeändert und als er zu Anfang der 1740er Jahre noch einmal an einer Revision arbeitete, stellte er gleichzeitig einen zweiten Zyklus zusammen, der zweifellos aus seinem Unterricht und seinen Aufführungen des ersten Teils über die Jahre hinweg entstanden war. Es wäre ein Fehler zu behaupten, dass es sich hier einfach um einen „Überschuss“ von Werken des ersten Zyklus handelt. Viele Stücke hatten einen langen Entstehungsprozess hinter sich und Bach transponierte eine Reihe von Werken, um sie in die Tonartenabfolge des neuen Zyklus einzupassen. Insgesamt betrachtet, handelt es sich hier um die größte und vielfältigste Sammlung aus seiner späteren Schaffensperiode und spiegelt Bachs zunehmendes Interesse an der Bandbreite der Musikgeschichte wider, wie er sie verstand—von Stücken, die sich auf die strengen kontrapunktischen Einschränkungen des späten 16. Jahrhunderts zurückbezogen (der sogenannte Stile antico), bis zu Werken, die im ultramodernen galanten Stil gehalten waren (diese weisen zum Teil Charakteristika der entstehenden Sonatenform auf).

Zwar existiert ein Autograph eines Großteils der Praeludien und Fugen des Wohltemperierten Klaviers Teil II (in der British Library in London, eines der besten Bachmanuskripte außerhalb Deutschlands), doch sind darin nicht alle Paare in ihrer vollendeten Fassung enthalten. Stattdessen ist darin ein relativ langer Zusammenstellungsprozess von etwa 1738 bis 1742 festgehalten, der in weiteren Abschriften und (heute verschollenen) Autographen fortgeführt wurde. Ebenso wie beim ersten Teil des Wohltemperierten Klaviers entsteht auch hier der Eindruck, dass es sich um ein Werk mit offenem Ende handelt, und dass Bach es anscheinend schwer fiel, sein Werk zu beenden.

Mehrere Eigenschaften des Londoner Manuskripts sind bemerkenswert: es ist auf großen Bögen, doppelt so groß wie normalerweise, notiert, wobei das Praeludium jeweils auf der einen Seite und die Fuge auf der anderen steht. Das weist darauf hin, dass dieses Manuskript (eigentlich eher eine Sammlung von einzelnen Blättern) speziell dafür angefertigt wurde, um das Spielen zu erleichtern; der Ausführende musste so nämlich nur jeweils nach einem Stück umblättern. Weiterhin ist bemerkenswert, dass einige Stücke von Bachs zweiter Ehefrau, Anna Magdalena, niedergeschrieben wurden. In manchen Fällen (etwa im F-Dur Praeludium) übernimmt Bach die Abschrift mitten im Stück, möglicherweise weil ihre Notenhandschrift zu weitläufig war und das Stück sonst nicht auf die Seite gepasst hätte. Häufig scheint Bach die Stücke zum Kopieren abgegeben zu haben, die die geringste kompositorische Aufmerksamkeit verlangten, diejenigen, die er in ihrer Anlage als am vollendetsten betrachtete (obwohl er selbst Details und Revisionen hinzufügte). Es erlaubt dies einen faszinierenden Einblick in die Notations- und Kopierweise Bachs: das Ehepaar Bach erstellte oft Manuskripte in Teamarbeit, entweder als Reinschriftexemplare oder auch zum Verkauf (wie es bei Anna Magdalenas Abschrift der Solosuiten für Violoncello der Fall ist), eine Art Heimindustrie, die es Bach erlaubte, seine Arbeit seinen Prioritäten entsprechend zu ordnen und gewisse Aufgaben abzugeben.

Die vielleicht interessantesten Stücke in Bezug auf Bachs Entwicklung als Komponist sind die zehn Praeludien in zweiteiliger Form (also in zwei Hälften, die jeweils wiederholt werden können). Zwar hatte er von Anfang an zweiteilige Stücke geschrieben, doch waren diese zumeist Tänze mit mehr oder minder vorhersehbaren Phrasierungen und Rhythmen, entsprechend dem jeweiligen Tanz. Weniger häufig in seiner früheren Schaffensperiode war das Konzept einer „freien“ Struktur (also nicht an einen Tanz gebunden) in zweiteiliger Form: im ersten Teil des Wohltemperierten Klaviers gibt es nur ein solches Stück. Doch als er Teil II zusammenstellte, setzten sich seine Söhne bereits mit dem neueren Ausdrucksmittel auseinander. Wie es typisch für ihn war, nahm der ältere Bach die neue Form nicht nur mit Gusto in sein Repertoire auf, sondern demonstrierte auch die Vielfältigkeit innerhalb der Form, als ob er schon seit Jahren in dieser Weise komponiert hätte. Einige Stücke sind auch entsprechend dem für Bach typischen „Inventionsstil“ angelegt, wo beide Hände sich ständig mit entsprechenden Verzierungen abwechseln (siehe die Praeludien in c-Moll, dis-Moll und e-Moll). Das E-Dur Praeludium hat vielleicht die subtilste zweiteilige Anlage; es ist zumeist dreistimmig gehalten und manchmal hören wir die Oberstimmen als eine einzelne Linie, wobei gewisse Noten ausgehalten werden, und manchmal deutet umgekehrt auch jede Stimme mehr als nur eine Linie an. Hierin befindet sich die Substanz von Bachs „Cantabile“-Stil; ein sicheres Gefühl für Richtung oder „Linie“ kann nicht unbedingt an einer einzelnen Melodie festgemacht werden—vielleicht ist es das, was Debussy meinte, wenn er von Bachs Sinn für das „Arabeske“ sprach.

Das anspruchsvollste zweiteilige Praeludium ist das in D-Dur, das eine solokonzertartige—fast orchestrale—Textur an den Tag legt, eine „Reprise“ des Anfangs im letzten Drittel des Stücks und Stimmungswechsel innerhalb der ersten Takte. Dieses letztere ist für Bachs spätere Werke nicht untypisch und repräsentiert einen Wandel der traditionellen barocken Ausdrucksform, wo ein einziger Affekt im Laufe eines Satzes zur Genüge ausgeschöpft wird. Die Praeludien in f-Moll und gis-Moll gehören zu den „modernsten“ Stücken, die Bach je komponierte (in dem Sinne, dass sie noch in seiner Reifeperiode so zeitgemäß waren). Die Textur ist schlicht gehalten, miteinander gepaarte „seufzende“ Stimmen antworten auf einen regulären Bass und werden mit sich wiederholenden motivischen Mustern abgewechselt. Hier ist das Alternieren von Motiven besonders stark ausgeprägt (was sich auch in den dynamischen Markierungen—einzigartig im gesamten Wohltemperierten Klavier—im gis-Moll Praeludium äußert). Aber es ist typisch, dass Bach diese im Laufe des Stücks einsetzt; sein kontrapunktisches Streben äußert sich hier insofern, als dass er verschiedene Stile und Anspielungen nebst eigentlichen musikalischen Linien miteinander kombiniert. Man kann sich die geteilte Reaktion eines zeitgenössisch modischen, galanten Komponisten darauf vorstellen: er mag sich zwar geschmeichelt gefühlt haben, dass der ältere Komponist sich mit der modernen Form auseinandersetzte, aber machte er sich womöglich darüber lustig? Oder verfehlte er völlig den leichtfüßigen Charakter? Oder, am allerschlimmsten, war es ihm einfach egal, was andere dachten?

Das Interesse am zweiten Teil des Wohltemperierten Klaviers beschränkt sich beileibe nicht nur auf die „Sonaten“-Sätze: von Anfang an hat man das Gefühl, dass Bach diesen Teil noch vielfältiger und noch großartiger als den ersten anlegen wollte. Das C-Dur Paar wurde mehrmals überarbeitet; Bach wollte hier die Anlage des Stücks vergrößern und die Tiefe des musikalischen Arguments erweitern. Das Praeludium, ebenso wie sein Pendant im ersten Teil, eröffnet den Zyklus in bemerkenswerter Weise und nimmt eine Stimmung ungetrübter Zuversicht an. Und doch ist die Komposition hier ambitionierter und die einzelnen Stimmen sind deutlicher dargestellt. Ein ähnlich reicher Klang wiederholt sich im F-Dur Praeludium, in dem altmodische Stilmittel—eine vier- bzw. fünfstimmige Struktur sowie der stile brisé der französischen Cembalomusik—mit der modernen Sonate und ihrer Reprise der Anfangsfiguren kombiniert werden. Der arpeggierte „Anfängerstil“ kommt im späteren Zyklus nur selten vor. Doch das erste Beispiel dafür, das Cis-Dur Praeludium, enthält zudem eine Überraschung, wenn die Textur in eine kurze Fughetta im Dreierrhythmus übergeht. Diese beiden Teile waren ursprünglich Praeludium und Fuge, wurden jedoch im Zuge der größeren Proportionen des Wohltemperierten Klaviers insgesamt zu einem Praeludium zusammengefasst. Die brillante Fingerarbeit aus Bachs Jugend kehrt auch in der späteren Sammlung zurück: das d-Moll Praeludium war eines der Stücke, die Bach im Laufe der Zeit ausdehnte und ausschmückte. Im direkten Kontrast dazu steht der wiegende Pastoralstil, den Bach in einigen Praeludien verwendet, nämlich die in cis-Moll, Es-Dur (das in dem relativ seltenen Metrum von 9/8 steht) und A-Dur.

Wie die Praeludien sind auch die Fugen des zweiten Teils noch vielfältiger gestaltet als im früheren Zyklus. Zwar sind hier weniger vielstimmige Fugen (dreistimmige Fugen sind die Norm) vorhanden, doch kommen viele Fugen in Anlage und Komplexität den Fugen aus Bachs kontrapunktischem Spätwerk gleich (eine frühe Fassung der Kunst der Fuge entstand etwa zur selben Zeit, als Bach den zweiten Teil des Wohltemperierten Klaviers abschloss). Die Fugenthemen sind oft recht animiert (wie etwa in der F-Dur Fuge) und manchmal „modern“, was die Kontraste der Motive anbelangt: in der d-Moll Fuge wird eine unkomplizierte Triolenbewegung mit einer absteigenden chromatischen Phrase kombiniert (und repräsentiert damit am Anfang gegensätzliche Stimmungen); ebenso werden in der e-Moll Fuge Triolen gegen punktierte Zweierrhythmen gesetzt. Die a-Moll Fuge beginnt mit einer Geste, die im 18. Jahrhundert viel verwendet wurde (z.B. in „And with his stripes“ in Händels Messiah und im „Kyrie“ von Mozarts Requiem), doch entwickelt Bach sie in einer Weise weiter, wie es für ein Chorwerk unmöglich gewesen wäre: von der Bewegungsintensivierung des Themas ausgehend, kommen im Gegenthema Zweiunddreißigstelnoten vor, was dieses Stück zu einem der feurigsten des gesamten Zyklus macht. Am kühnsten, was das Kompositorische angeht, sind die Doppel- und Tripelfugen (also Fugen, die mehr als ein Thema in Folge präsentieren und sie dann später im Stück miteinander kombinieren). In der cis-Moll Fuge hören wir schon bald das Thema in gespiegelter Umkehrung (was oft schon mehr als genug ist, um die Fähigkeiten eines Komponisten zu demonstrieren), doch später wird das, was zunächst wie eine chromatische Gegenmelodie klingt, selbst zu einem Thema, das dann mühelos mit dem Hauptthema verbunden wird. Die fis-Moll Fuge ist die einzige Tripelfuge in Teil II; hier geben die späteren Fugenthemen den Eindruck von zunehmend leichten Musikstilen, bis die gesamte Textur durch fortlaufende Sechzehntel des dritten Themas umgeformt wird. Was wie ein relativ feierliches Stück im „gelehrten“ Stil beginnt, nimmt nach und nach einen erzählerischen und dramatischen Charakter an.

Ein besonders befriedigendes Stilmittel in den Fugen des zweiten Teils ist die Augmentation, wenn wir ein Thema gegen sich selbst gesetzt im halben Tempo hören: in der c-Moll Fuge ist das gut hörbar, so, als ob es eine Erinnerung an die Bezüge zwischen den verschiedenen Ebenen in der Natur, oder auch in der Mathematik sein sollte. Tatsächlich sahen konservative Gemüter zu Bachs Zeit Ähnlichkeiten zwischen Dingen, die wir als ganz unterschiedlich einschätzen würden; das Wesen der Fugentechnik bestand zum Teil darin, Musik in einer solchen Weise weiterzuentwickeln und zu formen, dass diese Ähnlichkeiten deutlich würden. Bach betrachtete sein Komponieren zweifelsohne eher als einen Prozess des Entdeckens denn als völlig neues Erfinden.

Die E-Dur Fuge hält sich am stärksten an die strengen, quasi-Renaissance-Regeln (Bach, der sich stets weiterbildete, hatte sich Fux’ Traktat über den Kontrapunkt in den späten 1720er Jahren angeschafft). Dieses „späte“ Übernehmen einer „frühen“ Ausdrucksweise brachte einen klangvollen, hervorragend vokalen Stil hervor, der die Eigenschaften eines jeden Tasteninstruments zu überschreiten scheint. Doch machen keinesfalls alle Fugen von der Ernstheit dieses Genres Gebrauch: die Cis-Dur Fuge ist ein besonders unbeschwertes Stück, das die Technik der sich überlappenden Einsätze des (kurzen und anscheinend belanglosen) Themas zu parodieren scheint. Komik und Unbeschwertheit spielen auch eine wichtige Rolle in der F-Dur Fuge, die, wie Donald Francis Tovey beobachtete, zum Verhängnis der Lehrwerk-Autoren wurde, da sie kaum die Erfordernisse einer „akademischen“ Fuge erfüllt. In anderen Fugen, wie etwa die in f-Moll und Fis-Dur, kommen einige der Seufzerfiguren des galanten Stils vor, jene Ausdrucksform, die in den 1740er Jahren vielleicht im krassesten Gegensatz zur Fuge stand. Bach wollte damit wahrscheinlich demonstrieren, dass selbst das Triviale und Vergängliche tiefgehend sein kann; viele seiner Zeitgenossen hätten es als einen bedauerlichen Beweis für schlechten Geschmack und eine völlige Perversion des „Natürlichen“ betrachtet.

aus dem Begleittext von John Butt © 2009
Deutsch: Viola Scheffel

Recordings

Bach: Angela Hewitt plays Bach
CDS44421/3515CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
Studio Master: CKD463Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
CDS44291/44CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
CDA66351/44CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
Studio Master: CDA67741/44CDs for the price of 3Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier, Vol. 2
CDA67303/42CDsDownload currently discounted
Reger: Organ Music
SIGCD329Download only
Bach: Piano Transcriptions, Vol. 3 – Friedman, Grainger & Murdoch
CDA67344
Villa-Lobos: Bachianas brasileiras Nos 1 & 5
CDH55316Archive Service
Hyperion monthly sampler – December 2014
FREE DOWNLOADHYP201412Download-only monthly sampler

Details

No 01 in C major, BWV870. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 20 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [3'12] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 1 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'34] 2CDs
Track 1 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [3'04] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 1 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'34] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [3'04] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CKD463 CD3 [2'01] Download only
No 01 in C major, BWV870. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 21 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'14] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 2 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'36] 2CDs
Track 2 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [1'39] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 2 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'36] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [1'39] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CKD463 CD3 [1'40] Download only
No 02 in C minor, BWV871. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 22 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [3'29] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 3 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'29] 2CDs
Track 3 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'27] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 3 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'29] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'27] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CKD463 CD3 [2'00] Download only
No 02 in C minor, BWV871. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 23 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'24] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 4 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'48] 2CDs
Track 4 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'53] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 4 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'48] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'53] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CKD463 CD3 [1'45] Download only
No 03 in C sharp major, BWV872. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 15 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [2'36] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 5 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'56] 2CDs
Track 5 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [1'41] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 5 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'56] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [1'41] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CKD463 CD3 [1'44] Download only
No 03 in C sharp major, BWV872. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 16 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [2'21] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 6 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'52] 2CDs
Track 6 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'08] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 6 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'52] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'08] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CKD463 CD3 [1'38] Download only
No 04 in C sharp minor, BWV873. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 17 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [4'07] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 7 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [4'48] 2CDs
Track 7 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [4'47] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 7 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [4'48] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [4'47] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CKD463 CD3 [3'16] Download only
No 04 in C sharp minor, BWV873. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 18 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'12] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 8 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'14] 2CDs
Track 8 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'22] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 8 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'14] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'22] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CKD463 CD3 [2'01] Download only
No 05 in D major, BWV874. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 15 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [6'05] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 9 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [5'34] 2CDs
Track 9 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [5'49] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 9 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [5'34] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [5'49] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CKD463 CD3 [5'16] Download only
No 05 in D major, BWV874. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 16 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [3'30] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 10 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'57] 2CDs
Track 10 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'59] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 10 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'57] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'59] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CKD463 CD3 [1'57] Download only
No 06 in D minor, BWV875. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 17 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [1'57] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 11 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'30] 2CDs
Track 11 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [1'34] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 11 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'30] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [1'34] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CKD463 CD3 [1'35] Download only
No 06 in D minor, BWV875. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 18 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'11] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 12 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'10] 2CDs
Track 12 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'22] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 12 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'10] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'22] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CKD463 CD3 [1'38] Download only
No 07 in E flat major, BWV876. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 7 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [2'49] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 13 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'30] 2CDs
Track 13 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'47] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 13 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'30] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'47] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CKD463 CD3 [2'38] Download only
No 07 in E flat major, BWV876. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 8 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [2'48] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 14 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'48] 2CDs
Track 14 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [1'55] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 14 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'48] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [1'55] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CKD463 CD3 [1'35] Download only
No 08 in D sharp minor, BWV877. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 9 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [4'56] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 15 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [4'03] 2CDs
Track 15 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [4'18] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 15 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [4'03] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [4'18] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CKD463 CD3 [4'07] Download only
No 08 in D sharp minor, BWV877. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 10 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [4'07] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 16 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [4'32] 2CDs
Track 16 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [5'00] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 16 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [4'32] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [5'00] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CKD463 CD3 [2'19] Download only
No 09 in E major, BWV878. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 7 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [5'51] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 17 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [4'53] 2CDs
Track 17 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [4'41] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 17 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [4'53] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [4'41] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CKD463 CD3 [4'14] Download only
No 09 in E major, BWV878. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 8 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [3'16] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 18 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [3'28] 2CDs
Track 18 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [4'17] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 18 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [3'28] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [4'17] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CKD463 CD3 [2'14] Download only
No 10 in E minor, BWV879. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 9 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'39] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 19 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [4'13] 2CDs
Track 19 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [3'40] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 19 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [4'13] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [3'40] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CKD463 CD3 [3'37] Download only
No 10 in E minor, BWV879. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 10 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [3'44] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 20 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [2'47] 2CDs
Track 20 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [2'51] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 20 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [2'47] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [2'51] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CKD463 CD3 [2'40] Download only
No 11 in E major, BWV880. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 24 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [3'16] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 11 in E major, BWV880. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 25 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'13] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 11 in F major, BWV880. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 21 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [3'22] 2CDs
Track 21 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [3'31] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 21 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [3'22] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [3'31] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CKD463 CD3 [2'52] Download only
No 11 in F major, BWV880. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 22 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'39] 2CDs
Track 22 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [1'46] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 22 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'39] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [1'46] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CKD463 CD3 [1'30] Download only
No 12 in F minor, BWV881. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 1 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [5'08] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 23 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [4'44] 2CDs
Track 23 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [5'06] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 23 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [4'44] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [5'06] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CKD463 CD3 [3'34] Download only
Track 1 on HYP201412 [3'34] Download-only monthly sampler
No 12 in F minor, BWV881. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 2 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [2'25] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 24 on CDA67303/4 CD1 [1'52] 2CDs
Track 24 on CDA67741/4 CD3 [1'49] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 24 on CDS44291/4 CD3 [1'52] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CDS44421/35 CD10 [1'49] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CKD463 CD3 [1'57] Download only
Track 2 on HYP201412 [1'57] Download-only monthly sampler
No 13 in F sharp major, BWV882. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 19 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'51] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 1 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'28] 2CDs
Track 1 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'35] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 1 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'28] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'35] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CKD463 CD4 [2'42] Download only
No 13 in F sharp major, BWV882. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 20 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'06] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 2 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'32] 2CDs
Track 2 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [2'35] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 2 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'32] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [2'35] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CKD463 CD4 [2'05] Download only
No 14 in F sharp minor, BWV883. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 1 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [3'14] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 3 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'06] 2CDs
Track 3 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'21] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 3 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'06] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'21] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CKD463 CD4 [2'21] Download only
No 14 in F sharp minor, BWV883. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 2 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [4'53] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 4 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'42] 2CDs
Track 4 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'38] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 4 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'42] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'38] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CKD463 CD4 [3'36] Download only
No 15 in G major, BWV884. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 19 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [4'00] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 5 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'40] 2CDs
Track 5 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [2'32] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 5 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'40] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [2'32] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CKD463 CD4 [2'24] Download only
arranger

Track 11 on SIGCD329 CD2 [3'14] Download only
No 15 in G major, BWV884. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 20 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [1'40] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 6 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [1'13] 2CDs
Track 6 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [1'14] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 6 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [1'13] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [1'14] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CKD463 CD4 [1'16] Download only
arranger

Track 12 on SIGCD329 CD2 [1'35] Download only
No 16 in G minor, BWV885. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 21 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'26] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 7 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'39] 2CDs
Track 7 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [4'03] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 7 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'39] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [4'03] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CKD463 CD4 [2'22] Download only
No 16 in G minor, BWV885. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 22 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [3'57] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 8 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'37] 2CDs
Track 8 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [2'45] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 8 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'37] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [2'45] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CKD463 CD4 [2'48] Download only
No 17 in A flat major, BWV886. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 11 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [4'34] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 9 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [4'08] 2CDs
Track 9 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [4'17] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 9 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [4'08] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [4'17] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CKD463 CD4 [3'25] Download only
No 17 in A flat major, BWV886. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 12 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'42] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 10 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'39] 2CDs
Track 10 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'47] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 10 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'39] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'47] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CKD463 CD4 [2'15] Download only
No 18 in G sharp minor, BWV887. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 13 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'32] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 11 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [4'11] 2CDs
Track 11 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [4'06] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 11 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [4'11] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [4'06] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CKD463 CD4 [5'15] Download only
No 18 in G sharp minor, BWV887. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 14 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [4'53] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 12 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'20] 2CDs
Track 12 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'21] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 12 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'20] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'21] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CKD463 CD4 [3'25] Download only
No 19 in A major, BWV888. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 11 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'06] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 13 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'10] 2CDs
Track 13 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [2'21] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 13 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'10] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [2'21] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CKD463 CD4 [1'40] Download only
No 19 in A major, BWV888. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 12 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [1'39] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 14 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [1'13] 2CDs
Track 14 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [1'13] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 14 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [1'13] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [1'13] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CKD463 CD4 [1'21] Download only
No 20 in A minor, BWV889. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 13 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'54] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 15 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [4'27] 2CDs
Track 15 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [4'15] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 15 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [4'27] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [4'15] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CKD463 CD4 [3'30] Download only
No 20 in A minor, BWV889. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 14 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'12] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 16 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [1'29] 2CDs
Track 16 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [1'42] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 16 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [1'29] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [1'42] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CKD463 CD4 [1'42] Download only
No 21 in B flat major, BWV890. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 3 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [8'05] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 17 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [7'22] 2CDs
Track 17 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [7'19] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 17 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [7'22] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [7'19] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CKD463 CD4 [5'17] Download only
No 21 in B flat major, BWV890. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 4 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'05] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 18 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'36] 2CDs
Track 18 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [2'39] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 18 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'36] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [2'39] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CKD463 CD4 [1'54] Download only
No 22 in B flat minor, BWV891. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 5 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [3'35] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 19 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'09] 2CDs
Track 19 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'29] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 19 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'09] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'29] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CKD463 CD4 [2'27] Download only
No 22 in B flat minor, BWV891. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 6 on CDA66351/4 CD3 [6'14] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 20 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [4'36] 2CDs
Track 20 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [4'54] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 20 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [4'36] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [4'54] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CKD463 CD4 [3'21] Download only
No 23 in B major, BWV892. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 3 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'20] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 21 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'05] 2CDs
Track 21 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [1'52] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 21 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'05] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [1'52] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CKD463 CD4 [1'59] Download only
No 23 in B major, BWV892. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 4 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [4'11] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 22 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [3'27] 2CDs
Track 22 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [3'50] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 22 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [3'27] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [3'50] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CKD463 CD4 [2'30] Download only
No 24 in B minor, BWV893. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 5 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [3'05] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 23 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [2'13] 2CDs
Track 23 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [2'29] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 23 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [2'13] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [2'29] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CKD463 CD4 [1'47] Download only
No 24 in B minor, BWV893. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 6 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'30] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 24 on CDA67303/4 CD2 [1'44] 2CDs
Track 24 on CDA67741/4 CD4 [1'53] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 24 on CDS44291/4 CD4 [1'44] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CDS44421/35 CD11 [1'53] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CKD463 CD4 [1'48] Download only
No 5 in D major, BWV874. Movement 2: Fugue in D major
No 9 in E major, BWV878. Movement 2: Fugue

Track-specific metadata for CDA66351/4 disc 4 track 15

No 5 in D major, BWV874. Movement 1: Prelude
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-90-35415
Duration
6'05
Recording date
31 August 1988
Recording venue
St Cecilia's Hall, Edinburgh, Scotland
Recording producer
Tryggvi Tryggvason
Recording engineer
Tryggvi Tryggvason
Hyperion usage
  1. Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier (CDA66351/4)
    Disc 4 Track 15
    Release date: June 1990
    4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.