Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

The well-tempered Clavier Book 1, BWV846-869

composer
final form achieved in 1722, though subject to further revision throughout Bach's life

 
If one had to decide on the most influential works by Bach over the years since his death, the two most likely choices might be the St Matthew Passion and The Well-Tempered Clavier. While it was the Passion that—in Mendelssohn’s arrangement and ‘first’ performance of 1829—catapulted Bach into the forefront of German musical culture, the influence of The Well-Tempered Clavier has been more continuous, widespread and often hidden from the glare of publicity. What is remarkable for a work so old is that so many music lovers, musicians, composers and scholars of all levels have consistently found something worthwhile in it. This breadth of purpose is evident in Bach’s title page for the first volume: ‘For the profit and use of musical youth desiring instruction, and especially for the pastime of those who are already skilled in this study.’ In other words, Bach himself designed the collection as something to be both supremely instructive and also pleasurable. The lexicographer Ernst Ludwig Gerber recalled that his father had heard these pieces at first hand, played by Bach himself; the composer apparently played through the collection three times during the course of their lessons, after both had tired of more formal study.

Much of Bach’s later output seems to have been designed to provide authoritative examples, counteracting the growing taste for music that catered primarily to ephemeral fashions. But, almost paradoxically, many aspects of The Well-Tempered Clavier pointed as much to the future as to the past. Most obvious is Bach’s comprehensive survey of all the keys available within the tonal system. Although these had been theoretically possible for over a century, it was only relatively recently that keyboard instruments had been tuned in such a way as to render the less familiar keys more usable. Moreover, the very technique of keyboard fingering (and the standard proportions of keyboards) had hitherto excluded keys employing a large number of sharps and flats. A few composers before Bach had come close to covering most keys in a single collection (J C Fischer’s Ariadne musica of 1702 was an obvious influence on Bach) and the theorist Johannes Mattheson gave short examples in every key, but not fully fledged pieces. The complex genesis of Bach’s collections shows that he experimented with several ways of grouping pieces by key, before settling on the final scheme of covering the entire chromatic scale, from C, with the pieces presented in first the major and then the minor mode.

The very genre of ‘Prelude and Fugue’ might not have become so firmly established without Bach’s two encyclopaedic cycles. He inherited from older generations the genre of the ‘Praeludium’ (alternatively ‘Fantasia’ or ‘Toccata’), a loose amalgam of free and fugal elements that can alternate in unpredictable ways. Certainly, there was an increasing tendency to distill these two elements into two separate pieces, but, in Bach’s youth, this was still only one option among several. What probably appealed to Bach about the pairing of prelude and fugue was the fact that these two corresponded to the two main sides of his musical personality. On the one hand, he was renowned well beyond his homeland as a supreme virtuoso performer who could improvise with total spontaneity (a fact that is all too easily forgotten today when he is often labeled as a ‘composer’s composer’); on the other, he was undoubtedly the greatest musical thinker of his age, someone who could see inventive potential in any theme and who relished working out his thoughts on paper. The prelude–fugue pairing thus encapsulates Bach’s spontaneous, performative urge together with his more abstract, compositional thought. But it would be a mistake to suggest that all the preludes are ‘free’ and all the fugues are serious and ‘strict’. Indeed, having made the initial distinction, Bach positively relished mixing up these categories: a fugue might sound as characterful or carefree as a prelude, and a prelude may contain the complex musical devices that would normally be associated with fugue. One of the greatest aspects of Bach’s achievement as a composer was his ability to explore and ‘research’ a genre to a depth well beyond the norms of the day.

While it is customary to believe that Bach’s reputation plummeted in the latter half of the eighteenth century, this is really only true of his outward public image. For works such as The Well-Tempered Clavier had tremendous influence ‘behind the scenes’: Beethoven could play large sections by the age of eleven, and Mozart kept it close to hand throughout the last decade of his life. The fact that such seminal figures had access to the work before it was available in print (the first editions appeared over fifty years after Bach’s death) suggests that there must have been an extremely healthy network of manuscript copies. Soon after The Well-Tempered Clavier entered the public field at the outset of the new century, the concept of grouped preludes, often with pedagogic intention, became commonplace: witness the plethora of preludes (or ‘studies’) from composers such as Czerny, Chopin, Debussy, Hindemith and Shostakovich.

Why did such seemingly complex and ancient music rise to fame in the age of Romanticism? Schumann viewed The Well-Tempered Clavier as a collection of ‘character pieces’, thus aligning them with his own value system. But many of the pieces are indeed ‘character pieces’, in that they grasp a particular affect, compositional device or quality of movement, exploring this to the finest detail. If each piece is bound by ‘rules’, these are rules developed for this piece alone, often in the course of its individual progress. What to Bach may have been an exploration of the implications of a single inventive complex seems to have struck the Romantic generation as the manifestation of a certain refinement of spirit accessible only through the greatest of music, an individuality intimating a broader universality. Bach’s seemingly archaic musical world, steeped in an all-embracing religious order and sharing concepts of music that stretch back to Pythagorean times, was born afresh in the new era of Romantic aesthetics, and has remained an indispensable element of Western culture ever since.

Book I
Although legend has it that Bach composed The Well-Tempered Clavier Book I during a time of discontent and boredom, without access to an instrument, many of the pieces were drawn together from a variety of earlier sources and the process of composition and compilation was relatively protracted (reaching the present form in 1722, just before Bach moved to Leipzig). Certainly the notion of compiling a collection of pieces in every possible key must have required some thought. Early versions of some of the preludes are found in the Clavierbüchlein that Bach prepared for his eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann, in 1720–21. What is immediately clear about this collection is the fact that Bach’s primary aim was to facilitate keyboard technique and also acquaint the nine-year-old with the basics of composition. Many of these pieces are based on an arpeggiation or motivic development of simple progressions of chords. The C major and D major Preludes contain relatively simple sequences of chords, yet by casting one as an arpeggio piece and the other as a moto perpetuo for the right hand, Bach produced pieces that are clearly distinct. The young Friedemann would thus have learned that composition can begin with a simple re-arrangement of pre-existent patterns and, by exploring some of the standard figuration, one simultaneously exercised one’s keyboard skills. Much of the basis for composition was thus, literally, ‘in the fingers’.

It is clear from other sources that Bach decided on the prelude–fugue pairing early on in the process. The earliest version of the first book is preserved in a copy made some fifty years after Bach death, and here the preludes are sometimes shorter and simpler in construction. Bach’s biographer J N Forkel, writing at around the same time, believed these to reflect Bach’s ultimate intentions (rather than—precisely the opposite—his earlier efforts): the composer had apparently removed everything that was ‘superfluous’ and ‘tasteless’, thus producing a finer perfection than before. This is a revealing insight into how the tastes of any particular age not only colour one’s opinion of a composer but also one’s belief about his development and maturation. It now seems clear that Bach tended to lengthen pieces over time, to draw more implications out of the material and to develop it as far as possible. This reflects the same urge that is evident in his lessons for Friedemann: every pattern or idea can be developed, and any extant piece can be reused and reworked. Indeed the date of the autograph manuscript, 1722, is not the end of the story: Bach kept tinkering with the pieces for at least another twenty years. We gain the sense of a composer who was constantly striving for perfection; yet there is also a way in which the pieces are ultimately open-ended, as if absolute perfection can never quite be achieved on earth. Were Bach to have lived a few more decades, one might predict that he would still have been working on many pieces that today seem so ‘finished’ and established.

Given the relative novelty of the binary conception of prelude and fugue it is remarkable how well Bach ‘knew’ the genre, exploring every possibility within something that he was simultaneously inventing. The traditional conception of the ‘Praeludium’ (i.e. one that presents an alternation of free and fugal elements) survives in the Prelude in E flat major, a weighty amalgam of fugue and loose imitative fantasia that lies in striking contrast to the levity of the Fugue itself; it is almost as if Bach were reversing the connotations of the two genres, ‘seriousness’ devolving to the Prelude and lightness and simplicity to the Fugue. Other preludes work like ‘inventions’, where both hands have similar melodic material and thus cultivate independence of line and hand (e.g. the Prelude in F sharp minor). The B flat major Prelude develops the fingers in another way, combining an arpeggiated idiom with fast virtuoso passages. This texture—with its rhetorical chordal interjections—recalls the free quasi-improvised toccata of Bach’s youth or the fearsome cadenzas of his concertos for solo harpsichord.

Bach, on the title page to his ‘Inventions and Sinfonias’ referred to the need for the keyboard player to develop a ‘cantabile’ style of playing, in other words, a singing melody that is intuitively harder to accomplish in the keyboard medium than the vocal. Book I of The Well-Tempered Clavier is replete with pieces that cultivate melody (quite contrary to common perceptions—then and now—that Bach lacked a basic melodic facility): particularly striking is the haunting Prelude in E flat minor, an intensely expressive melody over a strumming chordal accompaniment; the C sharp minor Prelude combines the idea of aria with polyphony, by which the melodic line is shared between the hands. The cantabile style encompasses both the relatively relaxed, lyrical aria (E major) and the lament (B flat minor). Perhaps most striking in terms of keyboard style are those pieces that adopt other recent instrumental idioms, such as trio sonata (B minor Prelude) or concerto (A flat major Prelude): in the latter, Bach manages to create the impression of a larger texture (paradoxically, with relatively few notes) with a striking ‘tutti’ opening and hints of the ritornello form.

While some fugues look backwards to the severity of Renaissance counterpoint (B flat minor) all encapsulate a particular mood or character and the compositional technique is usually directed towards dramatic effect. The episodes—i.e. those sections where the ‘subject’ is absent—are particularly well-profiled in the C minor Fugue where the sense of expectation for the next entry is continuously cultivated (such as with a ‘false entry’ of the subject). Episodes are also a major element of the E flat major Fugue where the mood alternates between fleet brilliance and levity. The G major Fugue—one of the longest—sets up a pattern of perpetual motion in a dance-like metre, and, with a touch of the minor mode towards the end, drives towards a dramatic conclusion, recalling something of the ‘public’ genre of the concerto. Despite the outwardly dramatic nature of this Fugue, this is in fact one of the most complex pieces, presenting the subject in inversion (where the direction, up or down, of every successive note is reversed) and stretto (where the subject chases itself at a closer distance than usual). In other words, Bach often relishes hiding his skill as a contrapuntalist, the most sophisticated ‘tricks’ often serving a more dramatic or affective end. Conversely, as Laurence Dreyfus has observed, he also contrives to make pieces that are relatively simple in construction sound particularly impressive and ‘formal’ (most obviously the D major Fugue).

The opening C major Fugue is one of the most complex in that its main theme combines with itself at a variety of distances (stretto); yet we hear it as a real narrative event, not as a mere academic exercise. More severe are some of the fugues in the minor mode: of these, the G minor is the most dramatic while the B minor is the most monumental. This latter pleased Schoenberg, two centuries later, for including all twelve notes of the chromatic scale in its subject: however, we still hear the piece as unmistakably tonal, each chromatic step grounding its home key with a greater depth of colour and expression. Bach undoubtedly felt this to be a fitting end to a collection that, in its sequence of keys, had itself covered every note of the chromatic scale.

from notes by John Butt © 2009

Si l’on devait déterminer quelles œuvres de Bach ont exercé le plus d’influence depuis sa mort, les deux choix les plus probables pourraient être la Passion selon saint Matthieu et le Clavier bien tempéré. Si c’est la passion—dans l’arrangement de Mendelssohn, avec sa «première» exécution de 1829—qui a catapulté Bach au premier plan de la culture musicale allemande, l’influence du Clavier bien tempéré a été plus régulière, plus large et souvent plus à l’abri de la lumière éblouissante des projecteurs. Ce qui est remarquable pour une œuvre aussi ancienne, c’est que tant de mélomanes, de musiciens, de compositeurs et de musicologues de tous niveaux y aient toujours trouvé quelque chose d’intéressant. La page de titre de Bach pour le premier volume confirme ce large éventail d’objectifs: «Pour le bénéfice et l’usage de la jeunesse musicale désireuse de s’instruire et, en particulier, pour le passe-temps de ceux qui sont déjà bons dans cette étude.» Autrement dit, Bach a lui-même conçu ce recueil pour qu’il soit à la fois très instructif et également agréable. Le lexicographe Ernst Ludwig Gerber se rappelait que son père avait entendu ces pièces dans une exécution de première main, interprétées par Bach en personne; le compositeur a apparemment joué trois fois la totalité du recueil au cours de leurs leçons, lorsqu’ils étaient tous deux fatigués d’un travail plus formel.

Une grande partie des œuvres ultérieures de Bach semblent avoir été conçues pour donner des exemples faisant autorité, pour aller à l’encontre d’un goût de plus en plus répandu pour une musique répondant avant tout aux modes éphémères. Mais, et c’est presque paradoxal, bien des aspects du Clavier bien tempéré relèvent autant de l’avenir que du passé. L’étude détaillée de toutes les tonalités accessibles du système tonal que fait Bach est parfaitement évidente. Bien qu’il ait été théoriquement possible de jouer dans ces tonalités depuis plus d’un siècle, les instruments à clavier n’étaient accordés que depuis peu de temps pour faciliter l’emploi des moins familières d’entre elles. En outre, la technique même du doigté au clavier (et les dimensions habituelles des claviers) avaient jusqu’alors exclu les tonalités faisant appel à un grand nombre de dièses et de bémols. Quelques compositeurs avant Bach étaient arrivés à couvrir presque toutes les tonalités en un seul recueil (l’Ariadne musica de 1702 de J. C. Fischer a manifestement influencé Bach) et le théoricien Johannes Mattheson avait donné de courts exemples dans toutes les tonalités, mais pas des pièces complètes. La genèse complexe des recueils de Bach montre qu’il a expérimenté plusieurs façons de regrouper les pièces par tonalité, avant d’opter pour le système consistant à couvrir l’ensemble de la gamme chromatique, en partant de do, avec les pièces présentées d’abord dans le mode majeur, puis dans le mode mineur.

Le genre même du «Prélude et Fugue» ne se serait peut-être pas ancré avec une telle solidité sans les deux cycles encyclopédiques de Bach. Il a hérité des générations antérieures le genre du «Praeludium» (alternativement «Fantaisie» ou «Toccata»), vague amalgame d’éléments libres et fugués qui peuvent alterner de manières imprévisibles. Il ne fait aucun doute qu’il y avait une tendance de plus en plus forte à distiller ces deux éléments en deux pièces séparées, mais, dans la jeunesse de Bach, cela ne représentait qu’une option parmi tant d’autres. Ce qui a sans doute attiré Bach dans l’appariement du prélude et de la fugue, c’est que tous deux correspondaient aux deux principales facettes de sa personnalité musicale. D’une part, il avait acquis bien au-delà des frontières de son pays natal une solide réputation d’interprète et de virtuose, capable d’improviser avec une totale spontanéité (ce que l’on oublie par trop facilement de nos jours, lorsqu’on l’étiquette comme le «compositeur des compositeurs»); d’autre part, il ne fait aucun doute qu’il a été le plus grand penseur musical de son époque, quelqu’un qui était capable de trouver un potentiel inventif dans n’importe quel thème et qui se plaisait à coucher ses pensées sur le papier. L’appariement du prélude et de la fugue résume ainsi la soif d’exécution et de spontanéité de Bach, aussi bien que sa pensée créatrice plus abstraite en matière de composition. Mais laisser entendre que tous les préludes sont «libres» et que toutes les fugues sont sérieuses et «strictes» serait une erreur. En réalité, après avoir établi la distinction initiale, Bach a pris un véritable plaisir à mêler ces catégories: une fugue peut avoir autant de caractère et d’insouciance qu’un prélude, et un prélude peut contenir les procédés musicaux complexes généralement associés à la fugue. L’un des plus grands aspects de la réussite de Bach en matière de composition a été son aptitude à explorer et à «pousser la recherche» sur un genre à un niveau dépassant largement les normes de l’époque.

On croit habituellement que la réputation de Bach s’est effondrée au cours de la seconde moitié du XVIIIe siècle; mais, ça ne concerne en réalité que son image publique apparente. Car des œuvres comme le Clavier bien tempéré ont exercé une influence considérable «en coulisse»: Beethoven en jouait de larges extraits dès l’âge de onze ans et Mozart l’avait toujours à portée de main au cours des dix dernières années de sa vie. Le fait que des personnalités aussi déterminantes aient eu accès à cette œuvre avant qu’elle ne soit imprimée (les premières éditions ont été publiées plus de cinquante ans après la mort de Bach) laisse supposer qu’il devait exister une circulation très organisée d’exemplaires manuscrits. Peu après l’apparition du Clavier bien tempéré dans le domaine public au début du nouveau siècle, le concept de préludes groupés, souvent avec une intention pédagogique, est devenu monnaie courante: en témoigne la pléthore de préludes (ou «études») de compositeurs tels Czerny, Chopin, Debussy, Hindemith et Chostakovitch.

Pour quelle raison une musique apparemment complexe et ancienne est-elle devenue célèbre à l’époque romantique? Schumann considérait le Clavier bien tempéré comme un recueil de «pièces de caractère», se référant ainsi à son propre système de valeurs. Et nombre d’entre elles sont vraiment des «pièces de caractère», car elles saisissent une émotion particulière, un procédé de composition ou une notion de mouvement, et l’explorent dans les moindres détails. Si chaque pièce est tenue par des «règles», ce sont des règles élaborées pour cette seule pièce, souvent au cours de sa progression individuelle. Pour Bach, il s’agissait peut-être d’une exploration des implications d’un ensemble inventif unique. Mais cette exploration semble avoir frappé la génération romantique comme la manifestation d’un certain raffinement d’esprit accessible uniquement par le biais de la très grande musique, une individualité laissant supposer une universalité plus large. Le monde musical apparemment archaïque de Bach, imprégné d’un ordre religieux global et partageant des concepts musicaux qui remontent à l’époque de Pythagore, a connu une véritable renaissance à la nouvelle ère de l’esthétique romantique et, depuis lors, il est resté un élément indispensable de la culture occidentale.

Livre I
Même si, selon la légende, Bach a composé le Livre I du Clavier bien tempéré au cours d’une période de mécontentement et d’ennui, sans avoir accès à un instrument, un grand nombre de ces pièces proviennent de diverses sources antérieures et ont été réunies; et le processus de composition et de compilation a été relativement long (atteignant la forme actuelle en 1722, juste avant que Bach parte s’installer à Leipzig). L’idée de compiler un recueil de pièces dans toutes les tonalités possibles a probablement nécessité une certaine réflexion. On trouve les premières versions de certains préludes dans le Clavierbüchlein que Bach a préparé pour son fils aîné, Wilhelm Friedemann, en 1720–21. Il ressort d’emblée de ce recueil que le principal objectif de Bach était de faciliter la technique du clavier et aussi d’initier un garçon de neuf ans aux principes de la composition. Une grande partie de ces pièces reposent sur une arpégiation ou développement motivique de simples progressions d’accords. Les préludes en ut majeur et en ré majeur contiennent des séquences d’accords relativement simples, mais en faisant de l’une une pièce sur les arpèges et de l’autre un moto perpetuo pour la main droite, Bach a réalisé des œuvres qui sont bien distinctes. Le jeune Friedemann a ainsi appris que la composition peut commencer par un simple réarrangement de motifs préexistants et, en explorant certaines des figurations courantes, on peut en même temps exercer sa dextérité au clavier. Une grande partie de la base de la composition était ainsi, littéralement, «dans les doigts».

D’autres sources montrent clairement que, dans ce processus, Bach a opté assez tôt pour l’appariement du prélude et de la fugue. La plus ancienne version du premier livre est une copie réalisée une cinquantaine d’années après la mort de Bach et les préludes y sont parfois plus courts et plus simples de construction. Le biographe de Bach, J. N. Forkel a écrit, à peu près à la même époque, qu’il y voyait le reflet des intentions ultimes de Bach (plutôt que—précisément le contraire—ses premiers efforts): le compositeur avait apparemment retiré tout ce qui était «superflu» et «de mauvais goût», pour se rapprocher ainsi encore davantage de la perfection qu’auparavant. C’est un aperçu révélateur de la manière dont les goûts d’une certaine époque influent non seulement sur l’opinion que l’on a d’un compositeur, mais encore sur ce que l’on croit de son évolution et de de son mûrissement. Aujourd’hui, il semble clair que Bach a eu tendance à rallonger les pièces avec le temps, afin de tirer davantage d’implications du matériel et de le développer autant que possible. Le même désir manifeste se reflète dans ses leçons pour Friedemann: chaque modèle ou idée peut être développé et toute pièce existante peut être réutilisée et remaniée. En fait, la date du manuscrit autographe, 1722, n’est pas la fin de l’histoire: Bach a continué à faire des retouches à ses pièces pendant au moins vingt ans encore. On a le sentiment d’avoir à faire à un compositeur perpétuellement en quête de perfection; mais, d’une certaine manière, on peut les considérer comme des pièces ouvertes, comme si la perfection absolue ne pouvait jamais se réaliser totalement sur terre. Si Bach avait vécu quelques dizaines d’années de plus, on peut prédire qu’il aurait encore travaillé à de nombreuses pièces qui semblent aujourd’hui bien «finies» et établies.

Compte tenu de la relative nouveauté de la conception binaire du prélude et de la fugue, la façon dont Bach «connaissait» le genre est remarquable: il explorait toutes les possibilités au sein d’un concept qu’il était simultanément en train d’inventer. La conception traditionnelle du «Praeludium» (c’est-à-dire un prélude qui présente une alternance d’éléments libres et fugués) survit dans le Prélude en mi bémol majeur, fort amalgame de fugue et de fantaisie imitative assez libre qui présente un contraste frappant avec la désinvolture de la fugue elle-même; on a presque l’impression que Bach inverse les connotations des deux genres, le «sérieux» incombant au Prélude, la légèreté et la simplicité à la Fugue. D’autres préludes fonctionnent comme des «inventions», où les deux mains ont un matériel mélodique similaire et cultivent ainsi l’indépendance de ligne et de main (comme le Prélude en fa dièse mineur). Le Prélude en si bémol majeur développe les doigts d’une autre manière, alliant un langage arpégé à des passages rapides de virtuosité. Cette texture—avec ses interjections rhétoriques d’accords—rappelle la toccata libre presque improvisée de la jeunesse de Bach ou les redoutables cadences de ses concertos pour clavecin solo.

Sur la page de titre de ses «Inventions et Sinfonias», Bach a fait allusion au besoin, pour l’instrumentiste à clavier, de développer un style de jeu «cantabile», autrement dit, une mélodie chantante qu’il est intuitivement plus difficile à réaliser au clavier qu’avec la voix. Le Livre I du Clavier bien tempéré regorge de pièces qui cultivent la mélodie (à l’encontre des idées généralement répandues—alors et aujourd’hui—selon lesquelles Bach manquait d’une aisance mélodique de base): l’obsédant Prélude en mi bémol mineur est particulièrement frappant, une mélodie intensément expressive sur un accompagnement d’accords tapotés; le Prélude en ut dièse mineur allie l’idée d’aria à la polyphonie, qui partage la ligne mélodique entre les mains. Le style cantabile englobe à la fois l’aria lyrique relativement détendu (mi majeur) et la complainte (si bémol mineur). Les plus frappantes, en ce qui concerne le style du clavier, sont les pièces qui adoptent d’autres langages instrumentaux alors récents, comme la sonate en trio (Prélude en si mineur) ou le concerto (Prélude en la bémol majeur): dans ce dernier, Bach parvient à créer l’impression d’une texture plus large (paradoxalement, avec relativement peu de notes) grâce à un début «tutti» saisissant et à quelques touches de forme ritournelle.

Alors que certaines fugues reviennent à la sévérité du contrepoint de la Renaissance (si bémol mineur), elles ont toutes une atmosphère ou un caractère particulier et la technique de composition s’oriente généralement vers un effet dramatique. Les épisodes—c’est-à-dire les sections où le «sujet» est absent—sont particulièrement bien profilés dans la Fugue en ut mineur, où Bach cultive en permanence le sens de l’attente de l’entrée suivante (comme avec une «fausse entrée» du sujet). Les épisodes sont aussi un élément important de la Fugue en mi bémol majeur, où l’atmosphère alterne entre éclat fugace et légèreté. La Fugue en sol majeur—l’une des plus longues—est un modèle de mouvement perpétuel sur un rythme de danse et, avec une touche de mode mineur vers la fin, elle s’oriente vers une conclusion dramatique, rappelant un peu le genre «public» du concerto. Malgré la nature ouvertement dramatique de cette fugue, c’est en fait l’une des pièces les plus complexes; elle présente le sujet en renversement (c’est-à-dire que la succession de toutes les notes, vers le haut ou vers le bas, est inversée) et stretto (le sujet s’enchaîne sur lui-même à une distance plus rapprochée que d’habitude). Autrement dit, Bach se délecte souvent à cacher sa compétence de contrapuntiste, les «astuces» les plus sophistiquées servant souvent un but plus dramatique ou affectif. Inversement, comme l’a observé Laurence Dreyfus, il a aussi trouvé le moyen de composer des pièces de construction relativement simple et qui sont particulièrement impressionnantes et «formelles» (la plus évidente étant la Fugue en ré majeur).

La Fugue en ut majeur initiale est l’une des plus complexes, car son thème principal se combine avec lui-même à des distances variées (stretto); il se présente néanmoins comme un véritable événement narratif, non pas comme un simple exercice académique. Certaines fugues de mode mineur sont plus sévères: celle en sol mineur est la plus dramatique alors que celle en si mineur est la plus monumentale d’entre elles. Cette dernière a plu à Schoenberg, deux siècles plus tard, car son sujet comprend les douze notes de la gamme chromatique: toutefois, on la perçoit distinctement comme une pièce tonale, chaque degré chromatique fixant sa tonalité d’origine avec une plus grande profondeur de couleur et d’expression. Bach a certainement pensé qu’elle pouvait constituer la fin d’un recueil qui, dans sa séquence de tonalités, avait lui-même couvert toutes les notes de la gamme chromatique.

extrait des notes rédigées par John Butt © 2009
Français: Marie-Stella Pâris

Sollte man jenes Werk Bachs mit der größten Wirkungsgeschichte benennen, fiele die Wahl wahrscheinlich entweder auf die Matthäuspassion oder das Wohltemperierte Klavier. Während die Passion—in Mendelssohns Bearbeitung, erstmals 1829 aufgeführt—Bach mitten in die deutsche Musikkultur katapultierte, fand die Rezeption des Wohltemperierten Klaviers kontinuierlicher, weitgestreuter und eher im privaten Kreise statt. Für ein so altes Werk ist es bemerkenswert, dass so viele Musikliebhaber, Musiker, Komponisten und Forscher aller Niveaus darin immer wieder etwas Lohnenswertes gefunden haben. Dieser weitgespannte Zweck wird auf Bachs Titelseite des ersten Bandes deutlich: „Zum Nutzen und Gebrauch der Lehrbegierigen Musicalischen Jugend, als auch derer in diesem Studio schon habil seyenden besonderen ZeitVertreib.“ Mit anderen Worten, Bach hatte den Zyklus bewusst so angelegt, dass er sich einerseits als anspruchsvolles Lehrmaterial eignen und andererseits aber auch beim Spielen Freude machen würde. Der Lexikograph Ernst Ludwig Gerber erinnerte sich daran, dass sein Vater diese Stücke erster Hand von Bach selbst gehört hatte; der Komponist spielte im Laufe der Klavierstunden den Zyklus offenbar dreimal durch, wenn beide von dem formaleren Teil des Unterrichts erschöpft waren.

Bach scheint auch viele seiner späteren Werke so angelegt zu haben, dass sie als maßgebliche Beispielwerke gelten konnten; damit stellte er sich gegen einen immer verbindlicher werdenden zeitgenössischen Musikgeschmack, der hauptsächlich kurzlebigen Moden frönte. Jedoch, und das ist fast paradox, wenden sich viele Aspekte des Wohltemperierten Klaviers ebenso der Zukunft wie auch der Vergangenheit zu. Am deutlichsten äußert sich dies darin, dass Bach einen umfassenden Überblick aller Tonarten schuf. Obwohl diese theoretisch schon über ein Jahrhundert verfügbar gewesen waren, war es jedoch noch nicht lange her, dass die Tasteninstrumente in einer Weise gestimmt wurden, dass auch die ungewöhnlicheren Tonarten eingesetzt werden konnten. Zudem waren aufgrund der bis dahin üblichen Fingersatztechnik (sowie der verbreiteten Maße der Tastaturen) bestimmte Tonarten mit vielen Bs oder Kreuzen unmöglich zu spielen. Einer Handvoll Komponisten vor Bach war es gelungen, fast alle Tonarten in einem einzigen Zyklus einzusetzen (J. C. Fischers Ariadne musica von 1702 beeinflusste Bach ganz offensichtlich) und der Musiktheoretiker Johannes Mattheson fertigte kurze Beispiele in allen Tonarten an, nicht jedoch vollständige Stücke. Die komplexe Entstehungsgeschichte von Bachs Werkzyklen zeigt, dass er mit verschiedenen Arten der Stückezusammenstellung experimentierte, bevor er sich dafür entschied, die gesamte chromatische Tonleiter, von C ausgehend, abzudecken und die Stücke zuerst in der jeweiligen Durtonart und dann in der Molltonart zu präsentieren.

Die Gattung „Praeludium und Fuge“ hätte sich ohne Bachs enzyklopädische Zyklen möglicherweise gar nicht so stark durchgesetzt. Von den älteren Generationen übernahm er die Gattung „Praeludium“ (die sonst auch als „Fantasia“ oder „Toccata“ bezeichnet wurde), eine lose Mischung freier und fugaler Elemente, die in nicht festgelegter Weise alternieren können. Zwar zeichnete sich zunehmend die Tendenz ab, diese beiden Elemente in zwei separate Stücke zu teilen, doch war das, zumindest zu Bachs Jugendzeit, nur eine von mehreren Möglichkeiten. Was Bach wahrscheinlich an der Paarung von Praeludium und Fuge reizte, war die Tatsache, dass diese Dualität den beiden Hauptseiten seiner musikalischen Persönlichkeit entsprach. Einerseits war er weit über seine Heimat hinaus als herausragender Virtuose bekannt, der völlig spontan improvisieren konnte (eine Tatsache, die heutzutage allzu schnell in Vergessenheit gerät, wenn er als „Komponist der Komponisten“ beschrieben wird); andererseits war er zweifellos einer der größten musikalischen Denker seiner Zeit, der in jedem beliebigen Thema schöpferisches Potenzial sehen konnte und der großen Gefallen daran fand, seine Gedanken zu Papier zu bringen. Die Paarung Praeludium-Fuge verbindet also Bachs spontanen Aufführungsdrang mit seinen abstrakteren kompositorischen Gedanken. Es wäre jedoch ein Fehler zu sagen, dass alle Praeludien „frei“ und alle Fugen ernst und „streng“ seien. Nachdem er zunächst den Unterschied gemacht hatte, genoss Bach es sogar geradezu, die beiden Kategorien miteinander zu vermischen: eine Fuge kann demnach ebenso lebendig oder sorgenfrei klingen wie ein Praeludium und ein Praeludium kann die komplexen Stilmittel enthalten, die normalerweise mit Fugen in Verbindung gebracht werden. Einer der wichtigsten Aspekte von Bachs Bedeutung als Komponist war seine Fähigkeit, ein Genre zu „erforschen“ und sich so tiefgehend damit auseinanderzusetzen, dass er weit über die Normen seiner Zeit hinausging.

Zwar wird gemeinhin davon ausgegangen, dass Bachs Ruf in der zweiten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts dahinschwand, doch gilt das nur wirklich für sein äußerliches, öffentliches Image. Denn Werke wie das Wohltemperierte Klavier hatten „hinter den Kulissen“ enormen Einfluss: Beethoven konnte bereits mit elf Jahren große Auszüge daraus spielen und Mozart hielt es sich in den letzten zehn Jahren seines Lebens stets griffbereit. Die Tatsache, dass so einflussreiche Persönlichkeiten Zugang zu dem Werk hatten, bevor es gedruckt wurde (die ersten Ausgaben erschienen über fünfzig Jahre nach Bachs Tod), deutet darauf hin, dass es ein außerordentlich ausgedehntes Netz von Abschriften gegeben haben muss. Kurz nachdem das Wohltemperierte Klavier zu Beginn des nächsten Jahrhunderts in die Öffentlichkeit gelangte, wurde das Konzept von zusammengestellten Praeludien—oft zu Lehrzwecken—zu einer Art Norm: man denke an die Fülle von Praeludien (bzw. Préludes oder Etüden) von Komponisten wie Czerny, Chopin, Debussy, Hindemith und Schostakowitsch.

Wie konnte so offenbar komplexe und alte Musik einen derartigen Berühmtheitsgrad in der Romantik erreichen? Schumann betrachtete das Wohltemperierte Klavier als eine Sammlung von „Charakterstücken“ und ordnete sie so in sein eigenes Wertesystem ein. Eine große Anzahl der Stücke sind in der Tat „Charakterstücke“ in dem Sinne, dass sie sich einen bestimmten Affekt, ein kompositorisches Stilmittel oder eine Bewegungsart herausgreifen und sich damit ganz genau auseinandersetzen. Wenn jedes Stück von „Regeln“ bestimmt ist, so sind dies Regeln, die nur für dieses eine Stück gelten und oft im Laufe des Stückes erst entwickelt werden. Was für Bach wohl ein Erforschen der Auswirkungen eines einzigen schöpferischen Komplexes war, scheint für die romantische Generation die Manifestierung der Verfeinerung des Geistes bedeutet zu haben, die nur über die allergrößte Musik erreichbar war; eine Individualität, die eine größere Universalität andeutet. Bachs anscheinend veraltete musikalische Welt, die von einer allumfassenden religiösen Ordnung durchdrungen war und Musikkonzepte vertrat, die bis auf Pythagoras zurückgingen, wurde in der neuen Ära der romantischen Ästhetik wiederbelebt und ist seitdem ein unverzichtbares Element der westlichen Kultur geblieben.

Teil I
Obwohl es heißt, dass Bach den ersten Teil des Wohltemperierten Klaviers zu einer Zeit geschrieben haben soll, da er unzufrieden und gelangweilt war und keinen Zugang zu einem Instrument hatte, stammen eine ganze Reihe der Stücke aus früheren Quellen und der Kompositions- und Zusammenstellungsprozess war relativ langwierig (die heutige Form wurde erst 1722 erreicht, kurz bevor Bach nach Leipzig zog). Die Zusammenstellung einer Sammlung von Stücken in allen Tonarten wollte natürlich wohl bedacht sein. Frühere Versionen von einigen Praeludien liegen im Klavierbüchlein vor, das Bach für seinen ältesten Sohn, Wilhelm Friedemann, 1720–21 anlegte. Hierbei wird sofort klar, dass Bach mit diesem Büchlein hauptsächlich die Spieltechnik seines Sohnes verbessern und auch dem Neunjährigen die Grundlagen der Komposition beibringen wollte. Viele der Stücke beruhen auf einer Arpeggierung oder einer motivischen Weiterführung einfacher Akkordfortschreitungen. Die Praeludien in C-Dur und D-Dur haben relativ simple Akkordfolgen, doch dadurch, dass eins ein Arpeggio-Stück ist und das andere ein Moto Perpetuo für die rechte Hand, schafft Bach deutlich voneinander abgesetzte Stücke. Der junge Friedemann wird daraus also gelernt haben, dass das Komponieren mit einer einfachen Neuordnung von bereits vorhandenen Mustern beginnen kann und dass man durch das Hinzufügen von allgemein üblichen Verzierungen gleichzeitig seine Klaviertechnik verbessern kann. Ein Großteil dieser Kompositionsgrundlage lag also wortwörtlich „in den Fingern“.

Aus anderen Quellen wird deutlich, dass sich Bach schon früh für die Paarung Praeludium–Fuge entschied. Die früheste Version des ersten Teils ist als Kopie überliefert, die etwa fünfzig Jahre nach Bachs Tod angefertigt wurde; hier sind die Praeludien zuweilen kürzer und auch einfacher angelegt. Bachs Biograph J. N. Forkel schrieb um etwa diese Zeit herum und glaubte, dass diese Stücke Bachs endgültigen Absichten wiedergäben (und nicht das genaue Gegenteil, nämlich seine früheren Überlegungen): der Komponist hatte scheinbar alles „Überflüssige“ und „Geschmacklose“ weggestrichen und damit eine perfektionierte, verfeinerte Version geschaffen. Es ist dies ein interessanter Einblick, inwieweit der Geschmack einer bestimmten Zeit nicht nur die Meinung des Einzelnen über einen Komponisten, sondern auch die Ansichten bezüglich der Entwicklung und Reife des Komponisten beeinflussen kann. Heute scheint es erwiesen, dass Bach seine Stücke über einen gewissen Zeitraum hinweg ausdehnte, mehr Bezüge aus dem Material herausholte und so weit wie möglich entwickelte. Dasselbe muss auch in seinem Unterricht mit Friedemann passiert sein: jedes Muster oder Motiv kann weiterentwickelt werden und alle vorhandenen Stücke können wiederverwendet oder umgearbeitet werden. Und so ist auch das Datum des autographen Manuskripts, 1722, nicht endgültig: Bach kehrte zu diesen Stücken über einen Zeitraum von mindestens 20 Jahren immer wieder zurück und änderte sie um. Es ergibt sich daraus für uns ein Bild eines Komponisten, der ständig nach Perfektion strebte, und doch sind die Stücke letztendlich unvollendbar, als ob eine absolute Perfektion auf Erden niemals ganz erreicht werden könne. Hätte Bach noch einige Jahrzehnte länger gelebt, so würde er wahrscheinlich an vielen Stücken, die heute so „beendet“ und anerkannt scheinen, doch noch weitergearbeitet haben.

Wenn man bedenkt, dass die zweiteilige Form von Praeludium und Fuge relativ neu war, so ist es bemerkenswert, wie vertraut Bach mit dem Genre war und alle Möglichkeiten einer Form erkundete, die er gleichzeitig erfand. Die traditionelle Anlage des „Praeludiums“ (nämlich eines, in dem freie und fugale Elemente abwechselnd eingesetzt werden) ist im Praeludium in Es-Dur überliefert, wo eine gewichtige Mischung von Fuge und ansatzweise imitativer Fantasia im krassen Gegensatz zu der Leichtigkeit der Fuge selbst steht. Es ist hier fast so, als kehrte Bach die Konnotationen der beiden Genres um, indem er „Ernsthaftigkeit“ dem Praeludium und Leichtigkeit und Schlichtheit der Fuge zuordnet. Andere Praeludien sind wie „Inventionen“ angelegt, in denen beide Hände ähnliches melodisches Material zu spielen haben und damit eine gewisse Unabhängigkeit voneinander kultivieren (siehe das Praeludium in fis-Moll). Im B-Dur Praeludium werden die Finger wiederum in anderer Weise gefordert, nämlich indem hier Arpeggierungen mit schnellen, virtuosen Passagen kombiniert werden. Diese Struktur—mit ihren rhetorischen akkordischen Einwürfen—erinnert an die freie, quasi-improvisierte Toccata aus Bachs Jugend, oder auch an die angsteinflößenden Kadenzen in seinen Solokonzerten für Cembalo.

Auf der Titelseite seiner „Inventionen und Sinfonien“ geht Bach darauf ein, dass der Spieler sich eine kantable Spieltechnik aneignen möge, mit anderen Worten, eine singende Melodie, die auf einem Tasteninstrument schwerer zu realisieren ist als mit der Singstimme. Der erste Teil des Wohltemperierten Klaviers ist voller Stücke, in denen Melodien kultiviert werden (was im völligen Gegensatz zu der verbreiteten Auffassung sowohl damals wie auch heutzutage steht, dass Bach sich mit einfachen Melodien schwer getan habe): hier sticht besonders das eindringliche Praeludium in es-Moll hervor, eine intensiv expressive Melodie über arpeggierten Akkorden in der Begleitung; im cis-Moll Praeludium wird die Idee der Arie mit Polyphonie kombiniert, wobei die melodische Linie von beiden Händen gespielt wird. Der kantable Stil umfasst sowohl die relativ entspannte, lyrische Arie (E-Dur), wie auch das Lamento (b-Moll). Besonders bemerkenswert sind auch die Stücke, in denen andere instrumentale Stile der Zeit, wie etwa die Triosonate (h-Moll Praeludium) oder das Solokonzert (As-Dur Praeludium) in den Tasteninstrument-Stil eingepasst werden: im Letzteren gelingt es Bach, den Eindruck einer größeren Textur (paradoxerweise mit relativ wenigen Noten) durch einen eindrucksvollen „Tutti“-Anfang und Anklänge an die Ritornello-Form zu schaffen. Einige Fugen beziehen sich auf den strengen Renaissance-Kontrapunkt zurück (b-Moll); alle jedoch drücken eine gewisse Stimmung aus oder besitzen einen bestimmten Charakter und die Kompositionstechnik ist zumeist auf einen dramatischen Effekt ausgerichtet. Die Zwischenspiele—also die Passagen, in denen das „Thema“ nicht vorkommt—sind in der c-Moll Fuge besonders gut herausgearbeitet: hier wird die Erwartungshaltung für den jeweils nächsten Einsatz, etwa auch mit „Scheineinsätzen“, kontinuierlich kultiviert. Auch in der Es-Dur Fuge sind die Zwischenspiele ein wichtiges Element; hier alterniert die Stimmung zwischen flinker Brillanz und Leichtigkeit hin und her. In der G-Dur Fuge—eine der längsten—entsteht ein Muster kontinuierlicher Bewegung mit einem tanzartigen Rhythmus. Gegen Ende werden auch noch einige Moll-Elemente hinzugefügt und das Stück kommt zu einem dramatischen Schluss, nicht unähnlich dem „öffentlichen“ Genre des Solokonzerts. Trotz der äußerlichen dramatischen Eigenschaften dieser Fuge ist sie eines der komplexesten Stücke, in dem das Thema umgekehrt (d.h. die Intervalle erscheinen in umgekehrter Richtung) und in Engführungen (wo die Themeneinsätze schneller als normalerweise aufeinander folgen) präsentiert wird. Mit anderen Worten, Bach genießt es geradezu, seine kontrapunktischen Fähigkeiten etwas zu verstecken; die anspruchsvollsten „Tricks“ dienen oft einem dramatischeren oder affektiveren Schluss. Im Gegensatz dazu hat Laurence Dreyfus beobachtet, dass Bach ebenso Stücke entwirft, die in der Anlage recht simpel sind und aber besonders beeindruckend und „förmlich“ klingen (insbesondere die D-Dur Fuge).

Die erste Fuge in C-Dur ist eine der komplexesten, da hier diverse Engführungen vorkommen, und doch hören wir sie als zusammenhängendes Stück und nicht nur als akademische Übung. Etwas strenger angelegt ist eine Reihe der Moll-Fugen: von diesen ist die Fuge in g-Moll am dramatischsten, während die h-Moll Fuge am monumentalsten ist. Die letztere gefiel Schönberg zwei Jahrhunderte später besonders, da in dem Fugenthema alle zwölf Töne der chromatischen Tonleiter vorkommen: das Stück klingt jedoch unmissverständlich tonal und jeder chromatische Schritt festigt die Grundtonart mit einer jeweils größeren Farben- und Ausdruckstiefe. Bach fand ganz offensichtlich, dass dieses Stück ein passendes Ende für einen Zyklus sei, der mit seiner Abfolge von Tonarten jeden Ton der chromatischen Tonleiter abgedeckt hatte.

aus dem Begleittext von John Butt © 2009
Deutsch: Viola Scheffel

Recordings

Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
CDA66351/44CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Bach: Angela Hewitt plays Bach
CDS44421/3515CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
Studio Master: CKD463Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
CDS44291/44CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier
Studio Master: CDA67741/44CDs for the price of 3Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier, Vol. 1
CDA67301/22CDs
Harriet Cohen – The complete solo studio recordings
APR7304Download only
Villa-Lobos: Bachianas brasileiras Nos 1 & 5
CDH55316Archive Service
Reger: Organ Music
SIGCD329Download only
Walter Gieseking – The complete Homocord recordings and other rarities
APR6013for the price of 1 — Download only
Bach: Piano Transcriptions, Vol. 3 – Friedman, Grainger & Murdoch
CDA67344
Harold Bauer – The complete recordings
APR7302Download only
Irene Scharrer – The complete electric and selected acoustic recordings
APR6010for the price of 1 — Download only
Myra Hess – The complete solo and concerto studio recordings
APR7504Download only

Details

No 01 in C major, BWV846. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 4 on APR7304 CD1 [1'43] Download only
Track 1 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'51] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 23 on CDA66351/4 CD4 [2'40] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 1 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [2'08] 2CDs
Track 1 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'20] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 1 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [2'08] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'20] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CKD463 CD1 [2'00] Download only
No 01 in C major, BWV846. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 5 on APR7304 CD1 [2'26] Download only
Track 2 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'38] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 2 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'56] 2CDs
Track 2 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'08] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 2 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'56] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'08] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CKD463 CD1 [1'31] Download only
No 01 in C major, BWV846a. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 19 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'20] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 02 in C minor, BWV847. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 6 on APR7304 CD1 [1'29] Download only
Track 3 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'08] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 3 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'31] 2CDs
Track 3 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'35] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 3 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'31] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'35] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CKD463 CD1 [1'26] Download only
No 02 in C minor, BWV847. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 7 on APR7304 CD1 [1'58] Download only
Track 4 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'27] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 4 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'45] 2CDs
Track 4 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'52] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 4 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'45] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'52] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CKD463 CD1 [1'20] Download only
No 03 in C sharp major, BWV848. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 6 on APR6013 CD2 [1'06] for the price of 1 — Download only
Track 8 on APR7304 CD1 [1'27] Download only
Track 29 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'43] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 5 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'24] 2CDs
Track 5 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'23] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 5 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'24] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'23] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CKD463 CD1 [1'20] Download only
No 03 in C sharp major, BWV848. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 7 on APR6013 CD2 [2'03] for the price of 1 — Download only
Track 9 on APR7304 CD1 [2'49] Download only
Track 30 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'59] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 6 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [2'14] 2CDs
Track 6 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'19] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 6 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [2'14] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'19] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CKD463 CD1 [2'16] Download only
No 03 in C sharp major, BWV848: Prelude & Fugue
Track 11 on APR6010 CD2 [3'34] for the price of 1 — Download only
Track 10 on APR7302 CD2 [3'21] Download only
Track 3 on APR7504 CD1 [3'20] Download only
No 04 in C sharp minor, BWV849. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 10 on APR7304 CD1 [3'24] Download only
Track 4 on APR7304 CD2 [3'02] Download only
Track 1 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'33] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 7 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [2'31] 2CDs
Track 7 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [3'04] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 7 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [2'31] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [3'04] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CKD463 CD1 [1'53] Download only
arranger

Track 13 on SIGCD329 CD2 [3'50] Download only
No 04 in C sharp minor, BWV849. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 11 on APR7304 CD1 [4'23] Download only
Track 5 on APR7304 CD2 [4'37] Download only
Track 2 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [4'33] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 8 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [5'27] 2CDs
Track 8 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [5'24] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 8 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [5'27] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [5'24] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CKD463 CD1 [2'45] Download only
arranger

Track 14 on SIGCD329 CD2 [5'59] Download only
No 05 in D major, BWV850. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 12 on APR7304 CD1 [1'08] Download only
Track 9 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'46] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 9 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'21] 2CDs
Track 9 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'24] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 9 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'21] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'24] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CKD463 CD1 [1'11] Download only
No 05 in D major, BWV850. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 13 on APR7304 CD1 [3'30] Download only
Track 10 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'14] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 10 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [2'09] 2CDs
Track 10 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'13] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 10 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [2'09] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'13] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CKD463 CD1 [1'34] Download only
No 06 in D minor, BWV851. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 14 on APR7304 CD1 [1'16] Download only
Track 11 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'03] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 11 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'42] 2CDs
Track 11 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'40] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 11 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'42] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'40] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CKD463 CD1 [1'20] Download only
No 06 in D minor, BWV851. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 15 on APR7304 CD1 [2'42] Download only
Track 12 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'18] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 12 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [2'34] 2CDs
Track 12 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'59] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 12 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [2'34] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'59] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CKD463 CD1 [1'46] Download only
No 07 in E flat major, BWV852. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 16 on APR7304 CD1 [4'48] Download only
Track 7 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [4'53] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 13 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [3'34] 2CDs
Track 13 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [3'44] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 13 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [3'34] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [3'44] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CKD463 CD1 [3'28] Download only
No 07 in E flat major, BWV852. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 17 on APR7304 CD1 [2'19] Download only
Track 8 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'08] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 14 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'42] 2CDs
Track 14 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'40] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 14 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'42] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'40] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CKD463 CD1 [1'34] Download only
No 08 in E flat minor, BWV853. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 18 on APR7304 CD1 [4'39] Download only
Track 15 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [3'40] 2CDs
Track 15 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [3'58] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 15 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [3'40] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [3'58] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CKD463 CD1 [2'23] Download only
No 08 in E flat minor, BWV853. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 19 on APR7304 CD1 [4'45] Download only
Track 16 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [5'36] 2CDs
Track 16 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [5'16] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 16 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [5'36] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [5'16] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CKD463 CD1 [3'50] Download only
No 08 in E flat/D sharp minor, BWV853. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 9 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [4'09] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 08 in E flat/D sharp minor, BWV853. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 10 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [6'06] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 09 in E major, BWV854. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 20 on APR7304 CD1 [1'23] Download only
Track 17 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'01] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 17 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'27] 2CDs
Track 17 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'24] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 17 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'27] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'24] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CKD463 CD1 [1'18] Download only
No 09 in E major, BWV854. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 21 on APR7304 CD1 [1'36] Download only
Track 18 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'44] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 18 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'07] 2CDs
Track 18 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'06] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 18 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'07] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'06] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CKD463 CD1 [1'14] Download only
No 1 in C major, BWV846. Movement 2: Fugue in B flat major
No 10 in E minor, BWV855. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 19 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'54] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 19 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [2'19] 2CDs
Track 19 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'19] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 19 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [2'19] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'19] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CKD463 CD1 [1'42] Download only
No 10 in E minor, BWV855. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 20 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'28] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 20 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'10] 2CDs
Track 20 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'10] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 20 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'10] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'10] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CKD463 CD1 [1'23] Download only
No 11 in F major, BWV856. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 15 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [1'21] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 21 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'02] 2CDs
Track 21 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'02] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 21 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'02] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'02] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CKD463 CD1 [1'03] Download only
No 11 in F major, BWV856. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 16 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [1'38] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 22 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'35] 2CDs
Track 22 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [1'38] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 22 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'35] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [1'38] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CKD463 CD1 [1'12] Download only
No 12 in F minor, BWV857. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 17 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'28] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 23 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [1'52] 2CDs
Track 23 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [2'12] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 23 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [1'52] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [2'12] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CKD463 CD1 [1'14] Download only
No 12 in F minor, BWV857. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 18 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [4'41] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 24 on CDA67301/2 CD1 [4'38] 2CDs
Track 24 on CDA67741/4 CD1 [4'55] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 24 on CDS44291/4 CD1 [4'38] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CDS44421/35 CD8 [4'55] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CKD463 CD1 [2'49] Download only
No 13 in F sharp major, BWV858. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 25 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'13] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 1 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'30] 2CDs
Track 1 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'31] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 1 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'30] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'31] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 1 on CKD463 CD2 [1'24] Download only
No 13 in F sharp major, BWV858. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 26 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'37] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 2 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [2'19] 2CDs
Track 2 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [2'19] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 2 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [2'19] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [2'19] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 2 on CKD463 CD2 [1'33] Download only
No 14 in F sharp minor, BWV859. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 27 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'28] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 3 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'01] 2CDs
Track 3 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'01] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 3 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'01] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'01] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 3 on CKD463 CD2 [1'19] Download only
No 14 in F sharp minor, BWV859. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 28 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [3'18] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 4 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [3'17] 2CDs
Track 4 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [3'16] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 4 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [3'17] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [3'16] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 4 on CKD463 CD2 [1'52] Download only
No 15 in G major, BWV860. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 5 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'07] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 5 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [0'55] 2CDs
Track 5 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [0'54] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 5 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [0'55] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [0'54] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 5 on CKD463 CD2 [0'52] Download only
No 15 in G major, BWV860. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 6 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [3'23] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 6 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [2'59] 2CDs
Track 6 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [2'50] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 6 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [2'59] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [2'50] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 6 on CKD463 CD2 [2'38] Download only
No 16 in G minor, BWV861. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 7 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'10] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 7 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [2'03] 2CDs
Track 7 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [2'15] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 7 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [2'03] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [2'15] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 7 on CKD463 CD2 [1'09] Download only
No 16 in G minor, BWV861. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 8 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'54] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 8 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'45] 2CDs
Track 8 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'41] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 8 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'45] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'41] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 8 on CKD463 CD2 [1'32] Download only
No 17 in A flat major, BWV862. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 3 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [1'24] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 9 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'25] 2CDs
Track 9 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'22] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 9 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'25] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'22] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 9 on CKD463 CD2 [1'22] Download only
No 17 in A flat major, BWV862. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 4 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'58] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 10 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [3'06] 2CDs
Track 10 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [3'10] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 10 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [3'06] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [3'10] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 10 on CKD463 CD2 [1'56] Download only
No 18 in G sharp minor, BWV863. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 5 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [1'55] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 11 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'29] 2CDs
Track 11 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'30] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 11 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'29] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'30] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 11 on CKD463 CD2 [1'13] Download only
No 18 in G sharp minor, BWV863. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 6 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [3'10] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 12 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [2'22] 2CDs
Track 12 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [2'07] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 12 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [2'22] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [2'07] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 12 on CKD463 CD2 [1'52] Download only
No 19 in A major, BWV864. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 13 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'15] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 13 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'27] 2CDs
Track 13 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'28] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 13 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'27] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'28] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 13 on CKD463 CD2 [1'21] Download only
No 19 in A major, BWV864. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 14 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'39] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 14 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [2'00] 2CDs
Track 14 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [2'00] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 14 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [2'00] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [2'00] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 14 on CKD463 CD2 [2'02] Download only
No 20 in A minor, BWV865. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 15 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'19] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 15 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'02] 2CDs
Track 15 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [0'59] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 15 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'02] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [0'59] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 15 on CKD463 CD2 [1'08] Download only
No 20 in A minor, BWV865. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 16 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [6'11] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 16 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [5'38] 2CDs
arranger

Track 13 on CDA67344 [4'54]
Track 16 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [5'33] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 16 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [5'38] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [5'33] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 16 on CKD463 CD2 [3'48] Download only
No 21 in B flat major, BWV866. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 11 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [1'36] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 17 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'20] 2CDs
Track 17 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'25] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 17 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'20] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'25] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 17 on CKD463 CD2 [1'15] Download only
No 21 in B flat major, BWV866. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 12 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'13] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 18 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'50] 2CDs
Track 18 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [1'45] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 18 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'50] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [1'45] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 18 on CKD463 CD2 [1'38] Download only
No 22 in B flat minor, BWV867. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 13 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [2'50] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 19 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [4'02] 2CDs
Track 19 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [3'51] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 19 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [4'02] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [3'51] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 19 on CKD463 CD2 [2'17] Download only
No 22 in B flat minor, BWV867. Movement 1: Prelude in G minor
No 22 in B flat minor, BWV867. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 14 on CDA66351/4 CD2 [4'08] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 20 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [3'10] 2CDs
Track 20 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [3'08] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 20 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [3'10] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [3'08] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 20 on CKD463 CD2 [1'58] Download only
No 23 in B major, BWV868. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 21 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [1'36] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 21 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [1'03] 2CDs
Track 21 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [0'57] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 21 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [1'03] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [0'57] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 21 on CKD463 CD2 [0'57] Download only
No 23 in B major, BWV868. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 22 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [2'39] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
Track 22 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [2'24] 2CDs
Track 22 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [2'24] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 22 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [2'24] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [2'24] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 22 on CKD463 CD2 [1'36] Download only
No 24 in B minor, BWV859. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 23 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [3'32] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 24 in B minor, BWV859. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 24 on CDA66351/4 CD1 [7'16] 4CDs for the price of 3 — Archive Service
No 24 in B minor, BWV869. Movement 1: Prelude
Track 23 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [4'47] 2CDs
Track 23 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [4'40] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 23 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [4'47] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [4'40] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 23 on CKD463 CD2 [4'06] Download only
No 24 in B minor, BWV869. Movement 2: Fugue
Track 24 on CDA67301/2 CD2 [6'49] 2CDs
Track 24 on CDA67741/4 CD2 [6'57] 4CDs for the price of 3
Track 24 on CDS44291/4 CD2 [6'49] 4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CDS44421/35 CD9 [6'57] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Track 24 on CKD463 CD2 [5'08] Download only
No 8 in E flat minor, BWV853. Movement 1: Prelude in D minor

Track-specific metadata for CDA67301/2 disc 1 track 10

No 5 in D major, BWV850. Movement 2: Fugue
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-97-30110
Duration
2'09
Recording date
7 June 1997
Recording venue
Beethovensaal, Hannover, Germany
Recording producer
Ludger Böckenhoff
Recording engineer
Ludger Böckenhoff
Hyperion usage
  1. Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier, Vol. 1 (CDA67301/2)
    Disc 1 Track 10
    Release date: September 1998
    2CDs
  2. Bach: The Well-tempered Clavier (CDS44291/4)
    Disc 1 Track 10
    Release date: September 2007
    4CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.