Hyperion Records

Hears not my Phillis how the birds 'The Knotting Song', Z371
composer
late 1694, Thesaurus Musicus III, 1695
author of text

Recordings
'Purcell: Mr Henry Purcell's Most Admirable Composures' (CDH55303)
Purcell: Mr Henry Purcell's Most Admirable Composures
MP3 £4.99FLAC £4.99ALAC £4.99Buy by post £5.50 CDH55303  Helios (Hyperion's budget label)  
'Purcell: Secular solo songs, Vol. 2' (CDA66720)
Purcell: Secular solo songs, Vol. 2
MP3 £6.00FLAC £6.00ALAC £6.00Buy by post £10.50 CDA66720  Last few CD copies remaining   Download currently discounted
'Purcell: The complete secular solo songs' (CDS44161/3)
Purcell: The complete secular solo songs
MP3 £15.00FLAC £15.00ALAC £15.00Buy by post £16.50 CDS44161/3  3CDs Boxed set (at a special price)  
Details
Track 7 on CDH55303 [2'26] Helios (Hyperion's budget label)
Track 12 on CDA66720 [2'31] Last few CD copies remaining
Track 12 on CDS44161/3 CD2 [2'31] 3CDs Boxed set (at a special price)

Hears not my Phillis how the birds 'The Knotting Song', Z371
EnglishFrançais
The text to ‘The Knotting Song’ is by Sir Charles Sedley and was published in The Gentleman’s Journal of August and September 1694. Sedley was a notorious wit and something of a reprobate, and his poem was prefaced by Motteux with: ‘Happy the lover who with all his art can warm one of these cold beauties into pity, principally now the fit of Knotting (to speak in a lover’s phrase) possesses the best part of the finer half of human kind, and leaves them unconcerned for sighs and vows as the fair subject of this song.’

Purcell’s lighthearted setting probably dates from late 1694 and was published in the third book of Thesaurus Musicus (1695). Phillis, the subject of Sedley’s irritated attentions, was clearly an enthusiastic participant in London’s latest craze, knotting fringes.

from notes by Robert King © 2003

Track-specific metadata
Click track numbers opposite to select

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch