Hyperion Records

Partita No 3 in A minor, BWV827
composer
1728

Recordings
'Bach: Angela Hewitt plays Bach' (CDS44421/35)
Bach: Angela Hewitt plays Bach
MP3 £45.00FLAC £45.00ALAC £45.00Buy by post £50.00 CDS44421/35  15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)  
'Bach: The Six Partitas' (CDA67191/2)
Bach: The Six Partitas
Details
Movement 1: Fantasia
Track 1 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [2'04] 2CDs
Track 1 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [2'04] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Movement 2: Allemande
Track 2 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [2'57] 2CDs
Track 2 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [2'57] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Movement 3: Corrente
Track 3 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [3'09] 2CDs
Track 3 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [3'09] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Movement 4: Sarabande
Track 4 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [3'56] 2CDs
Track 4 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [3'56] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Movement 5: Burlesca
Track 5 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [2'17] 2CDs
Track 5 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [2'17] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Movement 6: Scherzo
Track 6 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [1'10] 2CDs
Track 6 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [1'10] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Movement 7: Gigue
Track 7 on CDA67191/2 CD2 [3'19] 2CDs
Track 7 on CDS44421/35 CD7 [3'19] 15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)

Partita No 3 in A minor, BWV827
EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
The Partita No 3 in A minor is unjustifiably rarely played. Perhaps its opening Fantasia is not considered ‘impressive’ enough. Certainly compared to the opening movements of the other five, it is very unassuming (it is in fact a lovely, easy-flowing two-part invention). It might sound simple, but unexpected turns in the two voices make it tricky to memorize. An elegant Allemande is followed by a vigorous Corrente with perky dotted rhythms and octave leaps. The Sarabande provides a moment of tender repose in an otherwise mostly restless suite. It is a trio of unusual beauty, and I find it easy to imagine two woodwind instruments playing over a continuo bass. In the earlier version of this Partita the Burlesca was entitled Menuet (the music is the same) and there was no Scherzo. These two movements, which should follow in rapid succession, considerably boost the overall energy of the piece and lead straight into the three-part Gigue fugue. Was Bach making fun of the rules of counterpoint when he wrote the descending scale in octaves in the Burlesca? I think it most likely.

from notes by Angela Hewitt © 1997

Track-specific metadata
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Details for CDA67191/2 disc 2 track 5
Burlesca
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-97-12205
Duration
2'17
Recording date
8 January 1997
Recording venue
Beethovensaal, Hannover, Germany
Recording producer
Ludger Böckenhoff
Recording engineer
Ludger Böckenhoff
Hyperion usage
  1. Bach: The Six Partitas (CDA67191/2)
    Disc 2 Track 5
    Release date: April 1997
    2CDs
  2. Bach: Angela Hewitt plays Bach (CDS44421/35)
    Disc 7 Track 5
    Release date: September 2010
    15CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
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