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Rastloses Wandern

First line:
Die Winde sausen am Tannenhang
composer
author of text

 
This song, probably written in the 1830s, is an indication of how much Randhartinger learned from Schubert. It has a broad sweep, an ongoing impulse that has the momentum of a sophisticated sonata movement or chamber music work. The interplay between major and minor keys is entirely Schubertian, and worthy of the highly charged atmosphere of Schubert’s own Schulze settings. The restless pace of a song like An mein Herz, or indeed Über Wildemann itself, is transplanted to another composer’s orbit with the greatest confidence. If Rastloses Wandern is not highly original, it is one of the best Schubert imitations ever penned. In writing this song Randhartinger, who shares the Schubertian Zeitgeist, proves his closeness to the composer far more convincingly than by invented anecdotes.

comparative Schubert listening:
Über Wildemann D884. March 1826

from notes by Graham Johnson © 2006

Recordings

Schubert: The Complete Songs
CDS44201/4040CDs Boxed set + book (at a special price)
Songs by Schubert's contemporaries
CDJ33051/33CDs

Details

Track 11 on CDJ33051/3 CD3 [4'25] 3CDs
Track 11 on CDS44201/40 CD40 [4'25] 40CDs Boxed set + book (at a special price)

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