Hyperion Records

Musae Jovis
composer
4vv
author of text
In Josquinum a prato, Musicorum principem, Monodia

Recordings
'Richafort: Requiem' (SIGCD326)
Richafort: Requiem
SIGCD326  Download only   Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'Richafort: Requiem & other sacred music' (CDA67959)
Richafort: Requiem & other sacred music
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67959  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Details
Track 1 on SIGCD326 [5'47] Download only

Musae Jovis
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The poem Musae Jovis, by Gerard Avidius, adopts a standard neo-Latin approach to the theme of death, contrasting earthly lament at the loss of the composer with the rejoicing in the heavens at his recruitment to the celestial choirs. The fact that this is couched in terms of Roman rather than Christian theology does not appear to have upset contemporary sensibilities.

Benedictus Appenzeller spent at least fifteen years in the service of Mary of Hungary, younger sister of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and regent of the Netherlands, at her court in Brussels. (Condé-sur-Escaut, where Josquin had spent his last years, is approximately fifty miles to the southwest.) Appenzeller’s version of Musae Jovis is relatively modest in scale, for only four voices and setting only the first twelve lines of text—thus concluding on a mournful note and omitting the references to Josquin’s admission to the ranks of the immortals. It employs the Phrygian modality, considered especially suitable for lamenting. Particularly effective moments are ‘ille occidit’ towards the end of the first section of music, with alternation of upper and lower voices, and several instances of emphatic homophony to underline important text phrases. The ‘pair imitation’ with which the two lower voices begin the piece, echoed by the two upper ones, was a technique favoured by Josquin.

from notes by Stephen Rice © 2012

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