Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CKD385
Recording details: March 2010
Nagoya University of Arts, Japan
Produced by Kim Campbell
Engineered by George Massenburg & Kazuri Arai
Release date: May 2011
Total duration: 9 minutes 48 seconds

'Steve Reich's trademark mesmeric repetitions take on another quality here when they are lifted away from their intended scoring and given to percussion. Japanese virtuoso Kuniko finds new sonorities in Electric Counterpoint, written for guitars, when transferring it to steel pans, marimba and vibraphone, and brings Vermont Counterpoint (for flutes) to dazzling, invigorating life on the vibraphone. All these studio works involve vast amounts of pre-recording to refine their pleasing results, none more so than Six Marimbas Counterpoint which involves five pre-recorded tracks behind a solo line. It's a hypnotic and strangely calming experience' (The Observer)

'The music is familiar, but the artist isn't. This is Japanese percussionist Kuniko's debut album for Linn, in which she premieres her own percussion arrangements of three of American minimalist Steve Reich's 'counterpoints' of the 1980s—Electronic Counterpoint, Six Marimbas Counterpoint and Vermont Counterpoint. She focuses on a sound world dominated by marimba, vibraphone and steel pans, which colour these works with soft-cushioned textures. But it is her direct collaboration with Reich, and a worldwide network of top sound producers, that adds sheen to the multi-tracked finished article' (The Scotsman)

'If you're a fan of Steve Reich's work, you'll certainly find this an interesting disc … Reich's music is based on rhythm, and percussion is the most apt type of instrument to perform it' (MusicWeb International) » More

Vermont Counterpoint
composer
1982; arranged in 2010 for vibraphone and pre-recorded tape
arranger

Introduction
Vermont Counterpoint (1982) was commissioned by flutist Ransom Wilson and is dedicated to Betty Freeman. It is scored for three alto flutes, three flutes, three piccolos and one solo part all pre-recorded on tape, plus a live solo part. The live soloist plays alto flute, flute and piccolo and participates in the ongoing counterpoint as well as more extended melodies. The piece could be performed by eleven flutists but is intend primarily as a solo with tape. The duration is approximately ten minutes. In that comparatively short time four sections in four different keys, with the third in a slower tempo, are presented. The compositional techniques used are primarily building up canons between short repeating melodic patterns by substituting notes for rests and then playing melodies that result from their combination. These resulting melodies or melodic patterns then become the basis for the following section as the other surrounding parts in the contrapuntal web fade out. Though the techniques used include several that I discovered as early as 1967 the relatively fast rate of change (there are rarely more than three repeats of any bar), metric modulation into and out of a slower tempo, and relatively rapid changes of key may well create a more concentrated and concise impression.

from notes by Steve Reich 2011

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch