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Track(s) taken from CKD415

Sonata in F major, ZWV181/5

composer

Ensemble Marsyas, Monica Huggett (violin)
Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
Recording details: August 2011
National Centre for Early Music, York, United Kingdom
Produced by Philip Hobbs
Engineered by Philip Hobbs & Robert Cammidge
Release date: September 2012
Total duration: 16 minutes 14 seconds

Cover artwork: A procession of Swiss guards after Cuyck (1752).
The Trustees of the British Museum
 
1
[Allegro]  [6'51]
2
[Adagio]  [3'06]
3
Allegro  [6'17]

Reviews

'The Ensemble Marsyas impresses me with their nimble fingers in the breakneck Sonata No 5, but it's the group's nuance that's transfixing. When textures become sparse, delivery intensifies; when the line expands, the tempo stretches; when counterpoint thickens, articulation is leavened. The players are audibly intelligent, at once humorous and illuminating. Non-interventionist engineering shows that less can be more when the artists are first rate … the players combine wit, taste and an earthy Bohemian wink to win the heart' (BBC Music Magazine)
The parts for Sonata V in F are for two oboes (Hautbois 1 and Hautbois 2), bassoon (Fagotto), and a bass which could be played either by a violone, or a theorbo (Violone ò Tiorba, an instruction also seen on the bass part for Sonata VI). It is notable that a keyboard instrument is not specified for any one of Zelenka’s instrumental works, and figures on the bass line of the sonatas are either non-existent or sparse. Sonata V is the sole example among the six to be modelled upon the Vivaldian concerto structure: slow-quick-slow, and Zelenka’s use of ritornello form in the outer two movements could be seen as his homage to the Venetian master. The ritornello of the opening movement – a theme played in unison with reference to the polka rhythm – exhibits great strength. A series of harmonic surprises characterize the beautiful arioso-like slow movement, while the final Allegro which opens with a three-part fugal exposition, contains lengthy solos of intricate passage work that require extraordinary technique from each player.

from notes by Janice B Stockigt 2012

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