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Hyperion Records

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Christ's Charge to Peter by Raphael (1483-1520)
Victoria & Albert Museum, London / Bridgeman Art Library, London
Track(s) taken from CDA67933
Recording details: August 2011
The Church of St Michael and All Angels, Summertown, Oxford, United Kingdom
Produced by Antony Pitts
Engineered by Justin Lowe
Release date: June 2012
Total duration: 31 minutes 2 seconds

'This gorgeous album presents all the works for eight voices which are certainly attributable to Mouton, plus one for five and two for four voices … these pieces are refreshingly airy and transparent. Mouton's exquisite music and The Brabant Ensemble's graceful performances are well-served by Antony Pitts' production and the acoustic of St Michael and All Angels, Oxford … highly recommended' (BBC Music Magazine)

'This outstanding disc by the youthful Brabant Ensemble, accomplished specialists in this repertoire … the Brabant's singing throughout is polished, flexible, lean and—exactly what you want here—transcendent' (The Observer)

'Mouton is given due attention and polish in these performances by The Brabant Ensemble. Such ingeniously structured pieces as the motet Nesciens mater are impressive in their richness of texture, and the main work, the Missa Tu es Petrus, deploys the voices in expressively fluent counterpoint' (The Daily Telegraph)

'The lucidity of both The Brabant Ensemble's singing and Rice's direction is hugely accomplished … [Missa Tu es Petrus is] a work of radiance and clarity … strikingly well sung … Hyperion is still setting the standard in this infinitely rewarding repertory' (International Record Review)

Missa Tu es Petrus
composer
5vv
author of text
Ordinary of the Mass

Kyrie  [3'38] GreekEnglish

Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Fifteen complete Mass-settings by Mouton survive, of which Missa Tu es Petrus is the only one not in four parts. Here a cantus firmus has four additional parts composed around it, making five in all. The cantus firmus is set unusually high in the texture. Indeed, in the Agnus Dei the tenor is notated with the rubric ‘in diatessaron’, meaning that it should be performed a fourth higher than written, thus creating a new and lighter texture for the final movement. Elsewhere the texture is varied by the omission of a voice part (usually the tenor, as in the Christe eleison and Crucifixus sections) or two (the Benedictus). Alongside his motets, the Mass as a whole demonstrates that, while aspects of his compositional technique are somewhat distinct from those of his great contemporary Josquin, Mouton is not just another sheep among the flock of Renaissance composers—he is, in the best sense, egregious.

from notes by Stephen Rice © 2012

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