Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 54 – Liszt at the Opera VI

Leslie Howard (piano)
2CDs
Recording details: December 1998
Unknown, Unknown
Produced by Tryggvi Tryggvason
Engineered by Tryggvi Tryggvason
Release date: March 1999
Total duration: 153 minutes 0 seconds
 
CD1
1
2
3
4
5
CD2
6
7
8
9
10

This is the sixth and final instalment of Leslie Howard's thorough survey of Liszt's opera paraphrases and transcriptions. The series now includes all the significant versions of every such work he composed. There are some real rarities, here including three complete works, never published by Liszt, which our pianist has prepared from the manuscripts. Also present is the legendary Tannhäuser Overture transcription – one of the most monumental of all piano works.

Reviews

'A bombshell selection that promises to hold the listener for hours on end. One almost imagines the fire of Liszt himself at the keyboard. Another jewel in Hyperion's legendary series.' (The Sunday Times)
This final offering of Liszt’s piano pieces on operatic themes presents works which range from the unpublished (Ernani, Freischütz, Il giuramento), through lesser-known versions of more familiar music (Huguenots, Sonnambula, Ruslan, Lucia/Parisina, Puritani) to one of the most notorious (Tannhäuser). Although there are some pieces which are missing from the present series because they have never turned up – Bellini’s Pirata, for one – or because they are so little different from other versions of the same title (tiny simplifications in the Tristan transcription or in the Einzug der Gäste from Tannhäuser make the final editions slightly less interesting; a version of the Masaniello Tarantella with a small cut seemed unnecessary, etc.), this collection completes the survey. (There are a few pieces of this genre which remained unfinished – the surviving fragments will appear in Volume 56.) The twelve discs of this series have thus presented far and away the most important body of works of this kind in the whole literature, at whose range and scope of invention and reinvention one can only marvel. The number of operas which Liszt attended, conducted, supported and transcribed is legion – his only failing in this respect was not to have written a mature opera of his own. A concise listing of the operas he transcribed, paraphrased or fantasized upon shows the vast extent of Liszt’s knowledge and concern:

Auber: La fiancée; La muette de Portici (Masanieo)
Bellini: I puritani; La sonnambula; Norma
Berlioz: Benvenuto Cellini
Delibes Jean de Nivelle
Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor; Parisina; Lucrezia Borgia; La favorite; Dom Sébastien
Erkel: Hunyadi László
Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha: Tony; Diana von Solange Glinka Ruslan i Lyudmila
Gounod: Faust; La reine de Saba; Roméo et Juliette
Halévy: La juive
Handel: Almira
Mercadante: Il giuramento
Meyerbeer: Les Huguenots; Robert le diable; Le prophète; L’africaine
Mosonyi: Szép Ilonka
Mozart: Don Giovanni; Le nozze di Figaro; Die Zauberflöte
Pacini: Niobe
Raff: König Alfred
Rossini: Ermione; La donna del lago; Armide; Otello; Le siège de Corinthe; Guillaume Tell
Spohr: Zemire und Azor
Spontini: Olympie; Fernand Cortez
Tchaikovsky: Eugene Onegin
Verdi: I lombardi; Ernani; Il trovatore; Rigoletto; Don Carlos; Aïda; Simon Boccanegra
Wagner: Rienzi; Der fliegende Holländer; Tannhäuser; Lohengrin; Tristan und Isolde; Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Das Rheingold; Parsifal
Weber: Der Freischütz; Oberon

(There are additional kindred works on themes from a zarzuela by Garcia and from an unidentified work by Soriano.)

A lapsus in a note to Liszt at the Opera V (Volume 50 of the series) suggests that the first version of the La fiancée fantasy is to be found in Volume 42, whereas it opens the present recital. The other information in that note, however, remains accurate: this work appeared – as did many a Liszt operatic fantasy – hard on the heels of the first performance of the opera upon which it is based (both works date from 1829) and is the first of Liszt’s mature works based upon operatic themes. (There are early sets of variations, and an Impromptu – all in Vol 26.) As we have previously noted, Liszt revised the piece in 1839, and reissued it in 1842, in what the Neue Liszt-Ausgabe somewhat ingenuously describes as a third version, with alterations so tiny (the piece is bar-for-bar the same as the second version, a few wrong notes are corrected, and half a dozen accompanying chords are slightly redistributed) that the second version does not merit separate performance or recording. The whole piece is based on the tenor aria from the second act of the opera, and is really an old-fashioned introduction, theme, variations – each with its concluding ritornello – and coda. In the original version the work consists of a long and very florid introduction (much shortened in the later versions, although there we find an added anticipation of the last variation) followed by the theme, four variations and finale. Liszt later dropped the original second variation, and altered the tonality at the beginning of the martial variation 3, whereas in the present version the music clings fairly rigidly to the tonic, only moving to the subdominant for the Barcarolle – variation 4. Without making great claims for its intrinsic musical merit, the piece remains important for being the first in a long and distinguished line, and for presenting for the first time the fully-fledged Liszt the pianist, with a devilish delight in what extreme demands may be made upon two hands at one keyboard. (We must remember that this is 1829: Schubert, Beethoven and Weber were only recently departed, Chopin’s Opus 10 Études had not appeared, nor had Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique, and Liszt had not yet heard Paganini.)

The standard Ernani paraphrase was issued with the paraphrases on Il trovatore and Rigoletto. It was based, in part, on an earlier, unpublished work, which is performed here: the later paraphrase confines itself to the finale of Act III – the King of Spain’s aria and chorus at Charlemagne’s tomb – and is an elaboration, transposed from A flat minor to F minor, of the second part of the earlier work (Verdi’s key is F minor). In the earlier piece the A flat minor section is preceded by an exceedingly florid transcription in E flat major (Verdi’s key) of a chorus from the finale of Act I: Elvira’s would-be lover is revealed to be Don Carlo, the King.

Two versions of the fantasy on Les Huguenots have already appeared in this series – the original version in Volume 50, the final version in Volume 42. The second version, recorded here, is almost identical to the first except that it allows for a large cut and a smaller one (neither observed here), and replaces the original frenetic final section with a grand statement of the Lutheran choral Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott – which coda is also adopted in the final version. In many ways this version is the best text of all, because it allows us the whole duet, which the final version does not, and yet has the better ending.

In the case of the Sonnambula fantasy, the second version appeared in Volume 50, and the final one in Volume 42. The present version is the first, although it was announced as a revised version when it first appeared, simply because the very first edition went out without any dynamics or other performing directions. The musical texts are otherwise identical.

The Chernomor March from Ruslan i Lyudmila appeared in its final form in Volume 6 – Liszt at the Opera I. By the time of the revision the language of the title had changed from French to German, and the text was somewhat simplified. The present version finds some quite different textures in its various treatments of Glinka’s splendid material, and Liszt’s coda (Glinka’s original does not have one) is another composition altogether in the later version (which was further recomposed when Liszt made his version for piano duet).

The Valse à capriccio is that rare specimen of a fantasy upon themes from two different operas (Liszt also combined Figaro and Don Giovanni – see Vol 30), and in the first version also contains material at the end which comes from neither of the operas in question: Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor and his lesser-known Parisina. If the later version, called Valse de concert (see Vol 30 – issued as the third of Trois Valses-Caprices, along with the final versions of the Valse de bravoure and the Valse mélancolique – see Vol 1) is a more subtle and refined piece, the early version contains a good deal of interesting music which was cut in the later piece. (The revision, however, restored the four bars missing from the F sharp major waltz – reinstated here by analogy with the corresponding passage eight bars earlier – an error not corrected in any subsequent publication of the early version.) For listeners familiar with the later version, it will be easily seen that the two pieces are similar in structure until the point where the first version breaks into a brisk 2/4 variation where the second version proceeds directly to the peroration. In the first version the waltz is resumed, but in 3/8, and the themes from the two operas are combined. This leads to the coda proper, which contains the above-mentioned foreign material (perhaps even composed by Liszt in the appropriate style) and a delightfully crazy passage with repeated octave semiquavers in 1/4 in the right hand against the 3/8 waltz in the left.

For some inscrutable reason Liszt subtitled his transcription of the Tannhäuser Overture Konzertparaphrase. A paraphrase it most certainly is not, and, with the tiniest exceptions, it proceeds faithfully, bar-for-bar, with Wagner’s score (the Dresden version, of course) and deserves to be considered alongside the transcriptions of the Beethoven symphonies, the Weber overtures, the William Tell Overture and the major orchestral works of Berlioz. Uniquely amongst Liszt’s works, the score contains no pedal directions at all, but the performer is instructed to use his discretion in the matter. On the face of it, the job is plainly to attempt an orchestral fullness of sound, and the few directions that one can transfer from parallel passages in the transcription of the Pilgrims’ Chorus suggest that one is to paint in broad strokes, and that the brass chords are the important foundation – upper details being of secondary importance. The transcription used to be a very popular warhorse at piano recitals, and it was memorably recorded by the great Benno Moiseiwitsch. Nowadays it is very seldom attempted in public – a pity.

The Puritani fantasy has remained a rarity, because of its great length and difficulty no doubt, and, as we have seen, Liszt extracted and somewhat simplified the concluding Polonaise for separate performance (the original fantasy and the Polonaise are in Vol 42). For the second edition of the fantasy – which must have followed the first almost immediately since it is not marked as a nouvelle édition in any way and still bears the Opus number 7 – he introduced some alternative left-hand chromatic rumbles towards the end of the first section and an optional shortening of the second section, with an entirely newly-composed bridge passage, giving a completely different atmosphere to the work.

The two remaining works are unpublished. The present writer is deeply indebted to Dr Kenneth Hamilton for copies of the original manuscripts, as well as for the benefits of his scholarly studies upon them, reflected gratefully in these notes: Liszt wrote to Marie d’Agoult in December 1840 that he had written a work upon themes from Der Freischütz (the manuscript is untitled) and wished to do something similar with Don Giovanni – which he did, to great acclaim – and, possibly, Euryanthe – which sadly he did not pursue. He worked on the Freischütz piece in tandem with the Sonnambula and Norma fantasies in 1841, and he may well have played it, but there the story ends. The manuscript is to all intents and purposes complete. It requires a tiny amount of editing for practical use (the addition of one bar at a point where Liszt specifies an addition without providing one, and one chord at a transition where Weber’s original chord can be easily inserted, as well as all dynamics, pedallings and performance directions, some of which can be deduced from Weber’s score). The first section of the fantasy is based on Agathe’s aria from Act III ‘Und ob die Wolke’ and continues into a pastoral rethinking of the rustic chorus from Act I, gently combining the two themes. The following section, based on the scene in the Wolf’s Glen, complete with shrieking owls, is an extraordinary piece of recomposition: Weber’s melodrama would not work in a straightforward piano transcription, and Liszt, in order better to get the music to flow, takes some considerable licence with the material, and yet serves only to illuminate it. The Huntsmen’s Chorus and the theme familiar both from the overture and the end of Agathe’s Act II aria ‘Leise, leise’ generate the third section of the work, and the rustic waltz returns for the coda. We do not know why this piece remained unprepared for publication – it is a worthy companion to Liszt’s other Weber transcriptions and fantasies, and is dramatically a very successful reflection of the spirit of the opera.

Liszt and Marie d’Agoult were living in Como, expecting the birth of their second child (Cosima) towards the end of 1837. Liszt went several times to La Scala in Milan during this period and into early 1838 – his life in Italy at this time has been marvellously reported by Luciano Chiapparì – and heard a number of works in performances which were for the most part not good. He said so in print, along with acid remarks about the state of the opera-goers’ understanding and behaviour, begged for a new masterpiece by Rossini – whose opera-composing days were over – and brought down much criticism upon his head (although if one studies the in-house reports of La Scala it is clear that even the management thought much of the 1837/8 season badly composed, produced and performed). However, in order to placate the enraged Milanese, Liszt organized a charity concert at La Scala on 10 September 1838 in which he played the William Tell Overture transcription, and another work entitled Réminiscences de La Scala. It is now clear that the unpublished and untitled manuscript usually described as a fantasy on Italian operatic melodies must be the otherwise missing work. Since, apart from one melody, all its themes come from Il giuramento by Mercadante – a composer whom Liszt praised in his La Scala article, and whose work he generally admired (see also the Soirées italiennes – Vol 24) – and that Il giuramento was triumphantly given on many occasions in 1837 at La Scala (amongst apparent dross by composers immediately forgotten), as well as the manuscript paper being of the kind that Liszt was using in 1838, make it extremely likely that this work must be the La Scala piece. Liszt played the fantasy again in 1840, and some of the revisions in the manuscript may date from then, and the score is fully marked-up for engraving. Yet the work remained unpublished – perhaps because Mercadante’s star waned so rapidly? – a fate which Liszt’s excellent piece does not merit. Three themes come from Il giuramento, a fourth theme (the bouncing E flat section in 6/8) does not, and to date has not been identified. The present writer begs to differ with Dr Hamilton’s suggestion that Liszt may have written it himself; in an overt act of homage to La Scala, one presumes Liszt would have used material recently familiar there. However, since the scores of much of what was given at La Scala at the time in question have not been available for consultation, and those that have do not yield up the tune, the mystery remains for the moment, and need not detract from the innate joys of Liszt’s fantasy. (The writer confesses immediately his ignorance of Odio e amore by Obiols, Gli aragonesi in Napoli by Conti, L’ajo nell’imbarazzo of Donizetti, Le nozze di Figaro by L Ricci (!), La solitaria delle Asturie by Coccia, Torvaldo e Dorliska of Rossini and Chiara di Rosemberg by Ricci, all of which were performed at La Scala whilst Liszt was in the vicinity. One would also like to hunt down I briganti of Mercadante, which was given on 6 November 1837, shortly before Liszt appeared in Milan.)

Leslie Howard © 1999

Cet ultime volume de pièces pour piano lisztiennes sur des thèmes opératiques propose des œuvres allant de l’inédit (Ernani, Freischütz, Il giuramento) au plus notoire (Tannhäuser), via des versions moins familières de musiques plus connues (Huguenots, Sonnambula, Ruslan, Lucia/Parisina, Puritani). Même si quelques œuvres manquent à la présente série – soit parce qu’elles n’ont pas été découvertes (Pirata de Bellini, par exemple), soit parce qu’elles diffèrent trop peu des autres versions du même titre (de minuscules simplifications dans la transcription de Tristan ou dans l’Einzug der Gäste de Tannhäuser rendent les éditions ultimes légèrement moins intéressantes; une version de la Tarentelle de Masaniello, avec une petite coupure, se parut inutile, etc.) –, ce recueil clôt le passage en revue des pièces sur des thèmes opératiques. (Quelques-unes demeurèrent inachevées; les fragments survivants paraitront dans le volume 56.) Les douze disques de cette série offrent donc, de loin, le plus important corpus d’œuvres de ce genre de toute la littérature, corpus dont nous ne pouvons qu’admirer l’éventail d’invention, de réinvention. Les opéras auxquels Liszt assista, ceux qu’il dirigea, soutint et transcrivit sont légion (son seul manquement fut de n’avoir pas écrit d’opéra abouti). Un bref récapitulatif de ceux dont il fit des transcriptions, des paraphrases ou des fantaisies prouve la vaste étendue de ses connaissances et de son intérêt:

Auber: La fiancée; La muette de Portici (Masaniello)
Bellini: I puritani; La sonnambula; Norma
Berlioz: Benvenuto Cellini
Delibes: Jean de Nivelle
Donizett: i Lucia di Lammermoor; Parisina; Lucrezia Borgia; La favorite; Dom Sébastien
Erkel : Hunyadi László
Duc Ernst de Saxe-Coburg-Gotha: Tony; Diana von Solange
Glinka: Ruslan i Lyudmila
Gounod: Faust; La reine de Saba; Roméo et Juliette
Halévy: La juive
Haendel: Almira
Mercadante: Il giuramento
Meyerbeer: Les Huguenots; Robert le diable; Le prophète; L’africaine
Mosonyi: Szép Ilonka
Mozart: Don Giovanni; Le nozze di Figaro; Die Zauberflöte
Pacini: Niobe
Raff: König Alfred
Rossini: Ermione; La donna del lago; Armide; Otello; Le siège de Corinthe; Guillaume Tell
Spohr: Zemire und Azor
Spontini: Olympie; Fernand Cortez
Tchaïkovski: Eugène Onéguine
Verdi: I lombardi; Ernani; Il trovatore; Rigoletto; Don Carlos; Aïda; Simon Boccanegra
Wagner: Rienzi; Der fliegende Holländer; Tannhäuser; Lohengrin; Tristan und Isolde; Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Das Rheingold; Parsifal
Weber: Der Freischütz; Oberon

(Signalons en outre des œuvres connexes sur des thèmes extraits d’une zarzuela de Garcia et d’une pièce non identifiée de Soriano.)

Un lapsus dans la notice de Liszt à l’opéra V (volume 50) laisse entendre que la première version de la fantaisie sur La fiancée figure dans le volume 42, alors qu’elle ouvre le présent récital. Les autres informations contenues dans cette notice demeurent, cependant, exactes: cette œuvre, parue – comme maintes fantaisies opératiques lisztiennes – peu après la première de l’opéra sur lequel elle se fonde (les deux œuvres datent de 1829), constitue la première pièce aboutie de Liszt sur des thèmes opératiques. (Il existe des corpus de variations antérieurs, ainsi qu’un Impromptu, tous dans le volume 26.) Comme nous l’avons déjà noté, Liszt révisa cette pièce en 1839, avant de la republier, en 1842, dans ce que la Neue Liszt-Ausgabe décrit quelque peu ingénument comme une troisième version, aux altérations si infimes (cette pièce est, mesure pour mesure, la même que la deuxième version; quelques notes erronées sont corrigées et une demi-douzaine d’accords d’accompagnement sont légèrement redistribués) que la deuxième version ne mérite pas d’être interprétée ou enregistrée séparément. Toute la pièce, qui repose sur l’aria de ténor du deuxième acte de l’opéra, est véritablement une introduction, thème, variations – chacune avec son ritornello conclusif – et coda à l’ancienne. Dans la version originale, l’œuvre consiste en une longue introduction, très ornée (fort accourcie dans les versions ultérieures, même si nous y trouvons l’ajout d’une préfiguration de la dernière variation), suivie du thème, de quatre variations et du finale. Liszt rejeta, par la suite, la deuxième variation originale et altéra la tonalité au début de la variation 3, martiale, tandis que, dans la présente version, la musique s’accroche assez rigidement à la tonique, ne se mouvant à la sous-dominante que pour la Barcarolle – variation 4. Sans prétendre à un grand mérite musical intrinsèque, cette pièce demeure importante: première œuvre sise en une longue ligne distinguée, elle présente également pour la première fois le Liszt-pianiste mature, qui se délecte diaboliquement des extrêmes que l’on peut demander à deux mains sur un clavier. (Rappelons que nous sommes en 1829: Schubert, Beethoven et Weber venaient juste de mourir, les Études, op.10 de Chopin n’avaient pas encore paru, pas plus que la Symphonie fantastique de Berlioz, et Liszt n’avait pas encore entendu Paganini.)

La paraphrase classique sur Ernani fut publiée avec les paraphrases sur Il trovatore et Rigoletto. Elle reposa, en partie, sur une œuvre antérieure, inédite, exécutée ici: la paraphrase ultérieure se borne au finale de l’acte III – l’aria du roi d’Espagne et le chœur sur la tombe de Charlemagne – et est une élaboration, transposée de la bémol mineur à fa mineur, de la seconde partie de l’œuvre antérieure (la tonalité de Verdi est fa mineur). Dans cette pièce antérieure, la section en la bémol mineur est précédée d’une transcription excessivement ornée, en mi bémol majeur (la tonalité de Verdi), d’un chœur du finale de l’acte I: le futur soupirant d’Elvira se révèle être Don Carlo, le roi.

Deux versions de la fantaisie sur Les Huguenots ont déjà paru dans la présente série (la version originale dans le volume 50, la version finale dans le volume 42). La deuxième version, enregistrée ici, est presque identique à la première, excepté qu’elle autorise deux coupures, une grande et une moindre (aucune n’est observée ici), et remplace la frénétique section finale d’origine par une grandiose énonciation du choral luthérien Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott – coda également adoptée dans la version finale. Cette version constitue, à bien des égards, le meilleur texte, car elle nous permet d’entendre le duo entier (contrairement à la version finale), tout en recelant la meilleure conclusion.

Les deuxième et dernière versions de la fantaisie sur la Sonnambula figurent respectivement dans les volumes 50 et 42. La présente version est la première, bien qu’elle fût annoncée, à sa première parution, comme une version révisée, juste parce que la toute première édition était sortie sans aucune dynamique ou autre indication d’exécution. Autrement, les textes musicaux sont identiques.

La forme finale de la Tscherkessenmarsch, extraite de Ruslan i Lyudmila, fait partie du volume 6 (Liszt à l’opéra I). Au moment de la révision, la langue du titre passa du français à l’allemand, et le texte fut quelque peu simplifié. La présente version trouve, dans ses divers traitements du splendide matériau de Glinka, certaines textures fort différentes, cependant que la coda de Liszt (l’œuvre originale de Glinka n’en comporte pas) est une composition totalement nouvelle dans la version ultérieure (que Liszt recomposa ensuite dans le cadre de sa version pour duo pianistique).

La Valse à capriccio est un de ces rares exemples de fantaisie sur des thèmes issus de deux opéras différents (Liszt combina également Figaro et Don Giovanni – voir volume 30); la première version présente aussi, à la fin, un matériau ne provenant d’aucun des opéras concernés, savoir Lucia di Lammermoor et Parisina (œuvre moins connue) de Donizetti. Si la version ultérieure, intitulée Valse de concert (voir volume 30 – publiée comme la dernière des Trois Valses-Caprices, aux côtés des versions finales de la Valse de bravoure et de la Valse mélancolique – voir volume 1), est une pièce plus subtile et raffinée, la première version compte nombre de passages intéressants, absents de la seconde version. (La révision cependant, restaura les quatre mesures qui manquaient à la valse en fa dièse majeur – et qui sont réinstaurées ici par analogie avec le passage correspondant, huit mesures avant –, une erreur demeurée sans correction dans toutes les publications subséquentes de la première version.) Les auditeurs familiers de la version ultérieure s’apercevront aisément que les deux pièces sont de structure similaire, jusqu’au moment où la première version entame une alerte variation à 2/4, là où la seconde version va directement à la péroraison. La première version voit la valse reprise, mais à 3/8, tandis que les thèmes des deux opéras sont combinés. Ce qui conduit à la coda proprement dite, qui comprend le matériau étranger susmentionné (peut-être une composition de Liszt dans le style approprié), ainsi qu’un passage délicieusement fou, avec des octaves répétées en doubles croches, à l/4, à la main droite, contre la valse à 3/8, à la gauche.

Pour quelque insondable raison, Liszt sous-titra sa transcription de l’ouverture de Tannhäuser Konzertparaphrase. Or, cette pièce n’est très certainement pas une paraphrase: à quelques infinitésimales exceptions près, elle suit fidèlement, mesure pour mesure, la partition de Wagner (la version de Dresde, bien sûr) et mérite d’être considérée aux côtés des transcriptions des symphonies de Beethoven, des ouvertures de Weber, de l’ouverture de Guillaume Tell et des grandes œuvres orchestrales de Berlioz. Fait unique chez Liszt, la partition ne comporte absolument aucune indication de pédale, laissée à la discrétion de l’interprète. Le travail consiste alors simplement à tenter d’atteindre à une plénitude sonore orchestrale, tandis que les rares indications transférables à partir des passages parallèles dans la transcription du Chœur des pèlerins suggèrent que l’on doit peindre en traits amples et que les accords des cuivres sont le fondement important – des détails de second ordre. Cette transcription – naguère un cheval de bataille très populaire dans les récitals pianistiques – fut mémorablement enregistrée par le grand Benno Moiseiwitsch. Elle est, malheureusement, très rarement tentée en public de nos jours.

La fantaisie sur les Puritani est demeurée une rareté, sans doute en raison de ses longueur et difficulté; comme nous l’avons vu, Liszt en dégagea, en la simplifiant un peu, la Polonaise conclusive à des fins d’interprétation séparée (la fantaisie originale et la Polonaise figurent dans le volume 42). Pour la seconde édition de cette fantaisie – qui a dû suivre presque immédiatement la première, car elle n’est nulle part marquée «nouvelle édition» et porte toujours le numéro d’opus 7 –, Liszt introduisit quelques grondements chromatiques ossia à la main gauche, vers la fin de la première section, et un accourcissement optionnel de la seconde section, avec un pont entièrement nouveau, conférant une atmosphère toute différente à l’œuvre.

Les deux œuvres restantes sont inédites. L’auteur est profondément redevable au Dr Kenneth Hamilton de lui avoir procuré des copies des manuscrits originaux et permis de bénéficier de ses études érudites – lesquelles trouvent un reconnaissant reflet dans les présentes notes. En décembre 1840, Liszt écrivit à Marie d’Agoult qu’il avait composé une œuvre sur des thèmes de Der Freischütz (le manuscrit est sans titre) et souhaitait réaliser quelque chose de similaire avec Don Giovanni – ce qu’il fit, avec force réussite – et, peut-être, Euryanthe – projet qu’il ne poursuivit, hélas, pas. En 1841, il travailla à la pièce sur le Freischütz, en tandem avec les fantaisies sur la Sonnambula et Norma; il se peut même qu’il l’ait jouée, mais là s’arrête l’histoire. Le manuscrit est, en fait, complet. Il requiert un minuscule travail éditorial, à vocation pratique (ajout d’une mesure, là où Liszt spécifie un ajout sans en fournir aucun; ajout d’un accord, à une transition, là où l’accord originel de Weber peut être aisément inséré; ajout de toutes les dynamiques, de toutes les indications des usages de la pédale et de l’exécution, dont certaines peuvent être déduites de la partition de Weber). La première section de la fantaisie repose sur l’aria d’Agathe (acte III) «Und ob die Wolke», avant de se poursuivre dans une refonte pastorale du chœur paysan de l’acte I, combinant paisiblement les deux thèmes. La section suivante, fondée sur la scène dans la Gorge aux loups, et ses cris de chouettes, est une extraordinaire recomposition: le mélodrame de Weber ne fonctionnerait pas dans une simple transcription pour piano et Liszt, désireux d’obtenir une meilleure fluidité de la musique, prend une considérable licence avec le matériau, à seule fin, cependant, de l’illuminer. Le Chœur des chasseurs, ainsi que le thème familier de l’ouverture et de la fin de l’aria d’Agatha (acte II) «Leise, leise» engendrent la troisième section de l’œuvre, puis la valse rustique revient pour la coda. Nous ignorons pourquoi cette pièce demeura non préparée pour la publication – digne compagne des autres transcriptions et fantaisies lisztiennes sur des œuvres de Weber, elle reflète avec un réel bonheur l’esprit de l’opéra.

Vers la fin de 1837, Liszt et Marie d’Agoult vécurent à Côme, attendant la naissance de leur deuxième enfant (Cosima). Durant cette période, et jusqu’au début de 1838, Liszt se rendit plusieurs fois à La Scala de Milan – la vie qu’il mena alors en Italie a été merveilleusement narrée par Luciano Chiapparì –, entendant un certain nombre d’œuvres dans des interprétations, pour l’essentiel, mauvaises. Il le dit par écrit, aux côtés de remarques acides sur la compréhension et le comportement des amateurs d’opéra, implora un nouveau chef-d’œuvre de Rossini – dont la période de composition d’opéra était terminée – et s’attira maintes critiques (l’étude des rapports internes de La Scala nous apprend toutefois que même la direction jugea une grande partie de la saison 1837/8 mal composée, produite et interprétée). Néanmoins, afin d’apaiser les Milanais furieux, Liszt organisa un concert de charité à La Scala, le 10 septembre 1838, où il joua la transcription de l’ouverture de Guillaume Tell et une autre œuvre, intitulée Réminiscences de La Scala. Il est désormais évident que le manuscrit inédit et sans titre, habituellement décrit comme une fantaisie sur des mélodies opératiques italiennes, doit être l’œuvre manquante. Hors une mélodie, tous ses thèmes proviennent d’Il giuramento de Mercadante – un compositeur que Liszt loua dans son article sur La Scala, et dont il admira généralement les œuvres (voir aussi Soirées italiennes – volume 24). Comme La Scala donna triomphalement cette œuvre, à maintes reprises, en 1837 (entre des rebuts de compositeurs tout de suite oubliés), et comme le papier du manuscrit est du genre de celui utilisé par Liszt en 1838, il est fort probable qu’il s’agisse de la pièce de La Scala. Liszt rejoua la fantaisie en 1840, et certaines des révisions du manuscrit peuvent remonter à cette année, la partition étant complètement annotée pour la gravure. Pourtant, l’œuvre demeura non publiée (peut être à cause de la trop rapide évanescence de l’étoile de Mercadante) – un sort que cette excellente pièce de Liszt ne mérite pas. Trois thèmes proviennent d’Il giuramento, cependant qu’un quatrième (la bondissante section en mi bémol, à 6/8) n’a, à ce jour, pas été identifié. Le présent auteur se permet d’être en désaccord avec la suggestion du Dr Hamilton, selon laquelle Liszt aurait écrit ce thème; l’on présume que Liszt aurait utilisé, pour un hommage ouvert à La Scala, un matériau alors familier à cette institution. Toutefois, les partitions d’une grande partie de ce qui fut donné à La Scala, à l’époque en question, n’ayant pas été disponibles à la consultation – et celles qui l’ont été n’ayant pas dévoilé la mélodie –, le mystère reste, pour l’heure, entier, ce qui ne doit, en rien, amoindrir les plaisirs innés de cette fantaisie de Liszt. (L’auteur avoue d’emblée ne pas connaître Odio e amore d’Obiols, Gli aragonesi in Napoli de Conti, L’ajo nell’imbarazzo de Donizetti, Le nozze di Figaro de L. Ricci (!), La solitaria delle Asturie de Coccia, Torvaldo e Dorliska de Rossini et Chiara di Rosemberg de Ricci, qui furent tous interprétés à La Scala pendant le séjour de Liszt. L’on souhaiterait également débusquer I briganti de Mercadante, donné le 6 novembre 1837, peu avant que Liszt se montrât à Milan.)

Leslie Howard © 1999
Français: Hypérion

Diese letzte Sammlung von Liszts Klavierkompositionen über Opernthemen besteht aus Werken, die von den unveröffentlichten (Ernani, Freischütz, Il giuramento) über weniger bekannte Versionen vertrauterer Kompositionen (Huguenots, Sonnambula, Ruslan, Lucia/Parisina, Puritani) bis zur bekanntesten von allen (Tannhäuser) reicht. Obwohl in der vorliegenden Reihe einige Stücke fehlen, da sie nie gefunden worden – Bellinis Pirata zum Beispiel – oder weil sie sich so wenig von den anderen Versionen des gleichen Titels unterscheiden (geringfügige Vereinfachungen der Tristan-Bearbeitungen oder des Einzugs der Gäste aus Tannhäuser machen das Endresultat etwas weniger interesant; eine Version der Masaniello Tarantella mit einer kleinen Streichung, die unnötig erschien usw.) vervollständigt diese Sammlung die Reihe. (Es gibt einige Stücke aus diesem Genre, die unvollendet blieben – die erhaltenen Fragmente werden in Band 56 erscheinen.) Die zwölf CDs dieser Reihe bieten somit mit Abstand die größte Sammlung von Werken dieser Art, die in der gesamten Literatur zu finden ist und über deren Umfang und Reichtum an Erfindungen und Neuerfindungen man nur staunen kann. Die Zahl der Opern, die Liszt besuchte, dirigierte, unterstützte oder bearbeitete ist unwahrscheinlich groß – seine einzige Schwäche in dieser Hinsicht ist nur, daß er nie eine eigene reife Oper schrieb. Eine kurze Auflistung der Opern, die er bearbeitete, paraphrasierte oder zu denen er Fantasien komponierte zeigt das ungeheuere Ausmaß von Liszts Wissen und Interesse:

Auber: La fiancée; La muette de Portici (Masaniello)
Bellini: I puritani; La sonnambula; Norma
Berlioz: Benvenuto Cellini
Delibes: Jean de Nivelle
Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor; Parisina; Lucrezia Borgia; La favorite; Dom Sébastien
Erkel: Hunyadi László
Ernst, Herzog von Saxe-Coburg-Gotha: Tony; Diana von Solange
Glinka: Ruslan i Lyudmila
Gounod: Faust; La reine de Saba; Roméo et Juliette
Halévy: La juive
Handel: Almira
Mercadante: Il giuramento
Meyerbeer: Les Huguenots; Robert le diable; Le prophète; L’africaine
Mosonyi: Szép Ilonka
Mozart: Don Giovanni; Le nozze di Figaro; Die Zauberflöte
Pacini: Niobe
Raff: König Alfred
Rossini: Ermione; La donna del lago; Armide; Otello; Le siège de Corinthe; Guillaume Tell
Spohr: Zemire und Azor
Spontini: Olympie; Fernand Cortez
Tchaikovsky: Eugen Onegin
Verdi: I lombardi; Ernani; Il trovatore; Rigoletto; Don Carlos; Aïda; Simon Boccanegra
Wagner: Rienzi; Der fliegende Holländer; Tannhäuser; Lohengrin; Tristan und Isolde; Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Das Rheingold; Parsifal
Weber: Der Freischütz; Oberon

(Es gibt weitere verwandte Werke zu Themen aus einer Zarzuela von Garcia sowie einem unbekannten Werk von Soriano.)

Ein Lapsus bei einem Begleittext zu Liszt at the Opera V (Band 50 der Reihe) deutet darauf hin, daß die erste Fassung von La fiancée in Band 42 zu finden ist, wohingegen sie den Anfang des vorliegenden Vortrags bildet. Die weitere Inhalt des Textes trifft jedoch nach wie vor zu: Das Werk folgte – wie viele von Liszts Opernfantasien – unmittelbar auf die Uraufführung der Oper, auf der es basiert (beide Werke stammen aus dem Jahr 1829), und es handelt sich bei ihm um das erste von Liszts reiferen Werken, dessen Grundlage Opernthemen bilden. (Es gibt frühe Sätze von Variationen und ein Impromptu – allesamt in Band 26 zu finden.) Wie wir zuvor schon festgestellt haben, überarbeitete Liszt das Stück 1839 und verlegte es 1842 als die in der Neuen Liszt-Ausgabe treffend beschriebene dritte Fassung mit so geringfügigen Änderungen (das Werk entspricht der zweiten Fassung Takt um Takt, wobei ein paar Noten korrigiert und ein halbes Dutzend Begleitakkorde etwas anders verteilt sind), daß es keine separate Aufführung oder Aufnahme verdient. Das gesamte Stück basiert auf der Tenorarie aus dem zweiten Akt der Oper und setzt sich im Grunde genommen aus einer altmodischen Einführung, dem Thema, den Variationen – mit jeweils einem Ritornell am Ende – und einer Koda zusammen. In seiner ursprünglichen Version besteht das Werk aus einer langen und stark figurierten Einleitung (die in den späteren Versionen stark verkürzt ist, obgleich wir dort eine zusätzliche Vorausnahme der letzten Variation vorfinden), gefolgt vom Thema, vier Variationen und einem Finale. Liszt ließ später die ursprüngliche zweite Variation wegfallen und änderte die Tonalität am Anfang der militärischen Variation Nr. 3, während in der vorliegenden Version die Musik ziemlich streng an der Tonika festhält und nur bei der Barcarolle – Variation Nr. 4 – zur Subdominante wechselt. Ohne großen Anspruch auf seinen inhärenten musikalischen Wert zu erheben, ist das Stück nach wie vor wichtig, da es das erste in einer langen und erlesenen Reihe ist und erstmals Liszt den Pianisten in voller Würde präsentiert, von diabolischer Freude darüber erfüllt, welch extreme Anforderungen zwei Händen auf einer Klaviatur erwarten können. (Wir müssen daran denken, daß dies das Jahr 1829 ist: Schubert, Beethoven und Weber hatten sich erst kürzlich verabschiedet, Chopins Opus 10 Études war ebenso wie Berlioz’ Symphonie fantastique noch nicht erschienen, und Liszt hatte Paganini noch nicht gehört.)

Die übliche Ernani-Paraphrase kam mit den Paraphrasen zu Il trovatore und Rigoletto heraus. Sie basierte teilweise auf einem früheren, unveröffentlichten Werk, welches hier gespielt wird: Die spätere Paraphrase beschränkt sich auf das Finale des 3. Aktes – die Arie des spanischen Königs und den Chor am Grab von Karl dem Großen – und es handelt sich dabei um eine von as-Moll zu f-Moll transponierte Ausarbeitung des zweiten Teils des früheren Werks (Verdi wählte die Tonart f-Moll). In dem früheren Stück geht dem Abschnitt in as-Moll eine außerordentlich starkt figurierte Bearbeitung in Es-Dur (der von Verdi verwendeten Tonart) eines Chors aus dem Finale des 1. Aktes voran: Es wird bekannt, daß der Mann, der gerne Elviras Geliebter würde, Don Carlos, der König, ist.

Zwei Fassungen der Fantasie zu Les Huguenots sind bereits in dieser Reihe erschienen – die Originalversion in Band 50 und die engültige Fassung in Band 42. Die zweite Fassung, die auf dieser Einspielung zu finden ist, ist mit der ersten fast identisch, mit der Ausnahme, daß sie eine große und eine kleinere Zäsur zuläßt (von denen hier keine zu beobachten ist), und den ursprünglichen frantischen Schlußabschnitt mit dem grandiosen Einsatz des lutheranischen Kirchenlieds Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott – ersetzt, dessen Koda in der Endfassung ebenfalls übernommen wurde. In vielerlei Hinsicht ist diese Version die beste von allen, denn sie gesteht uns das gesamte Duett zu, was bei der Endfassung nicht der Fall ist, und besitzt dennoch den besseren Schluß.

Im Falle der Sonnambula-Fantasie erschien die zweite Fassung in Band 50 und die endgültige Fassung in Band 42. Bei der vorliegenden Version handelt es sich um die erste, obgleich sie bei ihrem ursprünglichen Erscheinen als überarbeitete Version angekündigt wurde, einfach deshalb, weil die erste Ausgabe ohne jegliche Dynamiken oder andere Vortragsbezeichnungen veröffentlicht wurde. Die Noten sind ansonsten identisch.

Der Tscherkessenmarsch aus Ruslan i Lyudmila erschien in seiner endgültigen Form in Band 6 – Liszt at the Opera I. Bis zur Überarbeitung hatte sich die Sprache des Titels von Französisch zu Deutsch geändert, und der Text war etwas vereinfacht worden. Bei der vorliegenden Version finden wir bei den diversen Behandlungen von Glinkas prächtigem Material recht andersartige Strukturen, und Liszts Koda (Glinkas Original besitzt keine) ist überhaupt eine ganz andere Komposition in der späteren Version (die noch weiter umkomponiert wurde, als Liszt seine Version für das Klavierduett anfertigte).

Der Valse à capriccio ist ein rares Beispiel einer Fantasie zu Themen aus zwei verschiedenen Opern (Liszt kombinierte auch Figaro und Don Giovanni – siehe Band 30), und enthält in der ersten Version am Ende zudem Material, das aus keiner der beiden fraglichen Opern stammt: Donizettis Lucia di Lammermoor und seine weniger bekannte Parisina. Wenn es sich bei der späteren Version mit der bezeichnung Valse de concert (siehe Band 30 – herausgegeben als die dritte der Trois Valses-Caprices zusammen mit den endgültigen Fassungen des Valse de bravoure und des Valse mélancolique – siehe Band 1) ein subtileres und raffinierteres Stück ist, so enthält die frühe Version eine ganze Menge interessanter Musik, die aus dem späteren Stück gestrichen wurde. (Bei der Überarbeitung wurden jedoch die vier Takte, die beim Walzer in Fis-Dur fehlen wiederhergestellt und hier analog zur entsprechenden Passage acht Takte zuvor wieder eingesetzt – ein Fehler, der in keiner späteren Veröffentlichung der frühen Version korrigiert wurde.) Der mit der späteren Version vertraute Hörer kann leicht sehen, daß die beiden Stücke bis zu dem Punkt, wo die erste Version in eine flotte Variation im 2/4-Takt umschwingt und die zweite Version direkt zum Schluß führt, einander in der Struktur ähneln. In der ersten Version wird der Walzer wieder aufgenommen, jedoch im 3/8-Takt, und die Themen aus den beiden Opern lassen sich leicht kombinieren. Dies führt zur eigentlichen Koda, die das bereits erwähnte Fremdmaterial enthält (das vielleicht sogar von Liszt im passenden Stil komponiert wurde), sowie eine wunderbar verrückte Passage mit wiederholen Sechzehntelnoten im Okavabstand und im 1/4-Takt für die rechte Hand im Gegensatz zum Walzer im 3/8-Takt für die linke Hand.

Aus einem unerfindlichen Grund bezeichnete Liszt die Bearbeitung der Ouvertüre zu Tannhäuser als Konzertparaphrase. Eine Paraphrase ist sie aber ganz gewiß nicht, und abgesehen von den allerkleinsten Ausnahmen läuft sie treu, Takt für Takt parallel zu Wagners Partitur (der Dresdner Fassung natürlich) und verdient es, neben den Bearbeitungen der Beethoven-Symphonien, der Weber-Ouvertüren, der Ouvertüre zu Wilhelm Tell und den großen Orchesterwerken von Berlioz betrachtet zu werden. Als einziges von Liszts Werken enthält die Partitur überhaupt keine Pedalbezeichnungen, wobei jedoch der Spieler angewiesen wird, in dieser Sache nach eigenem Ermessen vorzugehen. An der Oberfläche soll ganz offensichtlich eine Klangfülle wie die eines Orchesters erreicht werden, und die wenigen Bezeichnungen, die sich von parallelen Passagen in der Bearbeitung des Pilgerchores übertragen lassen, deuten darauf hin, daß mit breiten Strichen gemalt werden soll und daß die Akkorde der Blechblasinstrumente das wichtige Fundament bilden – wobei die oberen Einzelheiten nur nebensächlich sind. Die Bearbeitung war früher ein wichtiges Schlachtroß bei Klaviervorträgen, und es liegt eine erinnernswerte Aufnahme vom großen Benno Moiseiwitsch vor. Heutzutage wagt man sich sehr selten an sie in der Öffentlichkeit heran. Das ist jammerschade.

Die Puritani-Fantasie ist aufgrund ihrer unbezweifelbar großen Länge und Schwierigkeit eine Rarität geblieben, und wie wir gesehen haben, hat Liszt die Polonaise am Schluß für einen separaten Vortrag herausgenommen und etwas vereinfacht (die Originalfantantasie und die Polonaise sind in Band 42 zu finden). Bei der zweiten Ausgabe der Fantasie – die fast sofort auf die erste gefolgt sein muß, da sie in keiner Weise als nouvelle édition gekennzeichnet ist und noch immer die Opus-Nr. 7 trägt – führte er gegen Ende des ersten Abschnitts einige fakultative chromatische Unruhen ein und einen ganz und gar neu komponierten Übergang, der dem Werk eine ganz andere Atmosphäre verleiht.

Die beiden anderen Werke bleiben unveröffentlicht. Ich bin Dr. Kenneth Hamilton zutiefst zu Dank dafür verpflichtet, daß er mir Kopien der Originalmanuskripte zukommen ließ, und für den Nutzen, den ich aus den von ihm verfaßten wissenschaftlichen Studien ziehen konnte, was ich dankbar in diesen Text aufgenommen habe: Liszt schrieb Marie d’Agoult im Dezember 1840, daß er ein Werk über die Themen aus Der Freischütz (das Manuskript ist titellos) geschrieben hat, und daß er etwas ähnliches mit Don Giovanni vorhatte – dies tat er auch sehr erfolgreich – und möglicherweise auch mit Euryanthe – was er jedoch leider nicht weiter verfolgte. Er arbeitete 1841 am Freischütz-Stück parallel zu den Sonnambula- und Norma-Fantasien, und es ist gut möglich daß er sie auch gespielt hat. Doch hier endet die Geschichte. Das Manuskript ist in jeder Hinsicht vollständig. Es benötigt nur ganz geringfügige Redaktionsarbeit, um in der Praxis genutzt werden zu können (den Zusatz eines Taktes, an einer Stelle, an der Liszt einen Zusatz vorschreibt, ohne einen bereitzustellen, sowie eines Akkords an einem Übergang, wo Webers ursprünglicher Akkord ohne Schwierigkeiten eingefügt werden kann, wie auch sämtliche Dynamiken, Pedalführungen und Vortragsbezeichnungen, von denen sich manche aus Webers Paritur erschließen lassen). Der erste Abschnitt der Fantasie basiert auf Agathes Arie aus dem Dritten Akt ‘Und ob die Wolke’, und fährt in einer pastoralen Neugestaltung des ländlichen Chores aus dem Ersten Akt fort und verbindet sanft die beiden Themen. Der folgende Abschnitt, der auf der Szene in der Wolfsschlucht basiert – mit allem Drum und Dran wie Eulengeschrei –, ist eine bemerkenswerte Neukomposition: Webers Melodrama würde in einer einfachen Klavierbearbeitung nicht funktionieren, und Liszt nimmt sich, um die Musik besser zum Fließen zu bringen, einige beachtliche Freiheiten beim Material heraus, die jedoch nur dazu dienen, es zu illuminieren. Der Jägerchor und das Thema, das sowohl aus der Ouvertüre als auch dem Ende von Agathes Arie im Zweiten Akt bekannt ist, ‘Leise, leise’, macht den dritten Abschnitt des Werks aus, und der ländliche Walzer setzt bei der Koda wieder ein. Wir wissen nicht, warum dieses Stück nicht zur Veröffentlichung vorbereitet wurde – es ist ein würdiger Begleiter zu Liszts anderen Weber-Bearbeitungen und -fantasien, und ist dramaturgisch eine ganz gelungene Widerspiegelung des Geistes der Oper.

Liszt und Marie d’Agoult lebten in Como, wo sie die Geburt ihres zweiten Kindes (Cosima) gegen Ende des Jahres 1837 erwarteten. Liszt ging während dieser Zeit und Anfang 1838 mehrere Male zur Mailänder Skala – über sein Leben in Italien zu jener Zeit erstattet Luciano Chiapparì herrlich Bericht – wo er bei Aufführungen eine Anzahl von Werken hörte, die größtenteils nicht gut waren. Seine diesbezüglichen Äußerungen wurden zusammen mit scharfen Bemerkungen darüber, wie es um den Wissensstand und das Verhalten der Opernbesucher stand, gedruckt, und er bat flehentlich um ein neues Meisterwerk von Rossini – dessen Tage als Opernkomponist vorbei waren – und zog dadurch viel Kritik auf sich (auch wenn es beim Studium der internen Berichte der Mailänder Skala deutlich wird, daß sogar die Leitung des Opernhauses der Ansicht war, daß vieles aus der Spielzeit 1837/38 schlecht komponiert, inszeniert und gespielt war). Um jedoch die wutentbrannten Mailänder zu besänftigen, veranstaltete Liszt am 10. September 1838 ein Wohltätigkeitskonzert, bei dem er die Bearbeitung der Ouvertüre zu Wilhelm Tell spielte, sowie ein weiteres Werk mit dem Titel Réminiscences de La Scala. Es ist nun klar, daß es sich bei dem unveröffentlichten und titellosen Manuskript, welches im allgemeinen als Fantasie über italienische Opernmeldodien beschrieben wird, um das ansonsten fehlende Werk handeln muß. Denn mit Ausnahme einer Melodie stammen alle Themen aus Il giuramento von Mercadante – einem Komponisten, den Liszt in in seinem Artikel über die Mailänder Skala lobte und dessen Schaffen er im allgemeinen bewunderte (siehe auch Soirées italiennes – Band 24) – und daß Il giuramento 1837 triumphierend zu zahlreichen Anlässen an der Mailänder Skala gespielt wurde (inmitten des offensichtlichen von Komponisten verbrochenen Schrotts, der sofort in Vergessenheit geriet), wie auch aufgrund der Tatsache, daß das Papier des Manuskripts der Art des von Liszt 1838 verwendeten entspricht, ist es höchstwahrscheinlich, daß es sich bei dem Werk um ein Stück für die Mailänder Skala handeln muß. Liszt spielte die Fantasie nochmals im Jahr 1840. Einige seiner Änderungen am Manuskript stammen vielleicht aus dieser Zeit, und die Partitur ist vollständig zum Druck vorbereitet. Doch das Werk wurde nicht veröffentlicht – vielleicht weil Mercadantes Berühmtheit so schnell schwand? – ein Schicksal, das Liszts ausgezeichnetes Stück nicht verdient. Drei Themen stammen aus Il giuramento, ein viertes Thema (der schwunghafte Abschnit in es-Moll im 6/8-Takt) hat einen anderen, bis heute noch ungeklärten Ursprung. Als Verfasser dieses Textes möchte Dr. Hamiltons Theorie widersprechen, daß Liszt es vielleicht selbst geschrieben hat; bei einer so offenen Geste der Ehrerbietung an die Mailänder Skala würde möchte man annehmen, daß Liszt dort in der letzten Zeit bekanntes Material verwendet haben würde. Da jedoch die Noten für den Großteil des Repertoires an der Mailänder Skala zum betreffenden Zeitpunkt nicht eingesehen werden konnten, und da in den zugänglichen Unterlagen die Melodie nicht aufzufinden war, bleibt dieses Rätsel vorerst ungelöst. Dies soll den inhärenten Freuden von Liszts Fantasien jedoch keinen Abbruch tun. (Der Autor gesteht sofort seine Unkenntnis bzgl. Odio e amore, Gli aragonesi in Napoli von Conti, L’ajo nell’imbarazzo von Donizetti, Le nozze di Figaro von L. Ricci (!), La solitaria delle Asturie von Coccia, Torvaldo e Dorliska von Rossini und Chiara di Rosemberg von Ricci, welche alle an der Mailänder Skala gespielt wurden, als Liszt sich in der Gegend aufhielt. Man möchte ebenfalls I briganti von Mercadente ausfindig machen, eine Oper, die am 6. November 1837, kurz vor Liszts Erscheinen in Mailand aufgeführt wurde.)

Leslie Howard © 1999
Deutsch: Anke Vogelhuber

Other albums in this series

Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.