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Hyperion Records

CDA66954/6 - Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 32 – The Schubert Transcriptions II
CDA66954/6

Recording details: June 1994
St Martin's Church, East Woodhay, Berkshire, United Kingdom
Produced by Tryggvi Tryggvason
Engineered by Tryggvi Tryggvason
Release date: April 1995
DISCID: F3104710 E411B610 03118213
Total duration: 218 minutes 54 seconds

GRAMOPHONE CRITICS' CHOICE

'His idiomatic grasp and utter reliability remain as admirable as in earlier instalments. Excellent sonics and informative notes by the performer' (American Record Guide)

'These discs not only bear moving witness to Howard's devotion to Liszt, and Liszt's devotion to Schubert, but also offer a wealth of insight into both composers' (Classic CD)

'Other performers should be inspired to include this repertoire in their programs after hearing Howard's persuasive presentation' (Piano & Keyboard)

The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 32 – The Schubert Transcriptions II
CD1
Himmelsfunken  [4'34]
Die Gestirne  [6'15]
Andante  [8'28]
Allegretto  [5'49]
Das Wandern  [2'01]
Der Jäger  [0'39]
Die böse Farbe  [2'51]
Wohin?  [3'15]
CD2
Die Stadt  [2'46]
Aufenthalt  [3'36]
Am Meer  [4'53]
Abschied  [5'19]
In der Ferne  [8'35]
Ihr Bild  [2'53]
Liebesbotschaft  [3'04]
Der Atlas  [2'56]
Die Taubenpost  [5'31]
Kriegers Ahnung  [7'12]
CD3
Gute Nacht  [5'14]
Die Nebensonnen  [4'06]
Mut  [1'37]
Die Post  [2'51]
Erstarrung  [3'44]
Wasserflut  [2'28]
Der Lindenbaum  [5'05]
Der Leiermann  [1'56]
Täuschung  [1'51]
Das Wirtshaus  [4'54]
Im Dorfe  [5'09]
Lebe wohl!  [4'29]
Mädchens Klage  [5'22]
Trockne Blumen  [3'05]
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Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
This second collection of Liszt’s tributes to the genius of Schubert is largely confined to song transcriptions, and especially to the sets of pieces based on the song cycles Die schöne Müllerin, Winterreise and the posthumously assembled Schwanengesang.

Liszt’s methods and intentions in his Schubert song transcriptions vary quite broadly. There are some simple arrangements, in which vocal line and accompaniment are wedded comfortably without much in the way of decoration. Then there are works where the first verse of a song is given unembroidered, but what amounts to a set of variations follows, and oft-times the variation is predicated by the text of the song. (Liszt’s number of variations is sometimes greater or fewer than the number of verses in Schubert’s songs, however.) Finally there is a group of very freely treated songs where the transcription endeavours to give full expression to the ideas behind the song as well as the musical text itself. This last phenomenon is the one which has caused most criticism historically, and therefore warrants a little explanation.

There is no doubt that simply adding the vocal line to the existing accompaniment does not often make a meaningful transcription, even though it might make a reasonable documentary account of the original notes. Just as in his transcriptions of orchestral music by Beethoven, Berlioz or Wagner, Liszt often conveys a precision of sound and spirit by his conscious avoidance of literal representation of the notes, so with the song transcriptions does he often compensate for the sound of a great singer in full flight in response to both words and music by adopting an apparently new musical text. Sometimes the tempo of a transcription, because of the variations in the verses, may seem slightly different from customary usage, but Liszt’s interpretations may also reveal to us a different attitude and tradition towards tempo which might otherwise not have survived. Of course, for much of the museum-culture-minded twentieth century, what were perceived as Liszt’s gross liberties with the text were sacrilegious, but any careful examination of Liszt’s broader aims shows his comprehensive understanding of Schubert’s idiom.

The Vier geistliche Lieder (‘Four Sacred Songs’) were gathered together by Liszt from two sources: the first three originals were published three years after Schubert’s death, and the fourth was issued in a version with piano by Schubert himself which seems to have escaped the compilers of Grove. (The original Geisterchor did not appear until even after Liszt’s death.) They were published as a set of four, and almost immediately were reissued in a set often with the Sechs geistliche Lieder (Gellert) transcribed from Beethoven (in Volume 15 of this series). Only the first of them is well known in song recitals—Litanei auf das Fest aller Seelen, D343a, (‘Litany for All Souls’ Day’) is a requiem prayer which Liszt treats with beautiful simplicity, even in the octave doublings of the second verse. Himmelsfunken, D651 (‘Heaven’s Gleam’) is a simple strophic song in contemplation of heaven, which Liszt arranges as a theme with two variations.

Die Gestirne (‘The Firmament’, D444) is a setting of Klopstock’s paraphrase of Psalm 19 (Vulgate 18), ‘The heavens declare the glory of God’, and Liszt’s response to Schubert and Klopstock is full of thunderous orchestral grandeur. Hymne is actually the Geisterchor (‘Chorus of Spirits’)—one of a group of vocal numbers from the ill-fated incidental music to Rosamunde, D797, which Schubert arranged with piano accompaniment (the original is for chorus with brass) which appeared in 1824 as Opus 25, with this particular piece as No 3. (The title of Schubert’s version with piano is confusing, because ‘Hymne’ applies legitimately to quite a number of Schubert songs and choruses.) The text, a likely candidate for the worst piece of German poetry, is by Wilhelmine von Chézy, and deals with Light living in the Depths and Shining (‘In der Tiefe wohnt das Licht. Licht daß leuchtet …’). Both Schubert and Liszt manage to make something quite beautiful from this tripe.

By 1846 Liszt had probably noticed that his long and complex Mélodies hongroises—his piano solo version of Schubert’s Divertissement à l’hongroise—were not being taken up, except for the central March (see Volume 31). He recast the piece, making trenchant cuts and simplifying a lot of the texture. The new publication bears the German title Schuberts Ungarische Melodien, and adds the legend ‘auf eine neue leichtere Art gesetzt’ (‘arranged in a new easier manner’). Typically, Liszt’s understanding of what an amateur might find easy was compromised by the fact that he himself seemingly found nothing to be difficult. As a result, many passages are well out of the range of domestic music-making. The less weighty effect of this version gained it a brief life in concert, but sadly this version has been out of print for nearly 150 years.

Liszt had already made two transcriptions from Die schöne MüllerinTrockne Blumen and Ungeduld—when he produced his set of Six Mélodies favorites in 1846, in which the former does not appear and the latter is transcribed anew and in a different key. Liszt makes a palindromic key pattern by setting the pieces in B flat major, G minor, C minor/C major/C minor, G major and B flat major, even though this puts the narrative of the original quite out of order and changes Schubert’s keys for numbers 4 and 6—originally in B major and A major. But the musical argument is transcendent when the text is less germane.

Die schöne Müllerin (‘The Fair Mill-maid’, D795) is far too familiar to require much explanation. Liszt chooses numbers 1, 19, 14, 17, 2 and 7 from the original twenty settings of Wilhelm Müller: Das Wandern (‘Wandering’) is two verses shorter than the song expressing the poet’s joy in tramping about, but is delightfully varied. The conversation about the misery and the happy mystery of love, Der Müller und der Bach (‘The Miller and the Stream’) is extended by an extra variation to the last verse and is one of the finest of all Liszt’s transcriptions, so close does it get to letter and spirit of the song whilst writing inventively and originally at the same time. The two verses of Der Jäger (‘The Huntsman’)—in which the poet asks the hunter to keep away from the stream and shoot only that which frightens his loved one—are given a very sprightly decoration, and are set either side of the transcription of Die böse Farbe (‘The Evil Colour’). This is shorn of its short introduction and coda, but handled very ebulliently, with some treacherous double notes in the right hand to stress the pride and boldness of the lover’s preferred and mocking green.

Wohin? (‘Whither?’) solves the problem of adding the voice to the accompaniment by dividing the babbling brook which has attracted the poet’s attention between the inner fingers of the two hands, and occasionally by letting it wash the melody from above; and Ungeduld (‘Impatience’)—the poet is desperate to proclaim his love to the whole world—is set, like the first song, with one fewer verse than Schubert, in a theme and two variations. (For the later versions of these transcriptions, entitled Müllerlieder, see Volume 33.)

The remaining transcriptions on the first disc are based upon three very familiar songs—Meeresstille (‘Sea Calm’, D216), in which Liszt manages to convey motionless water and dread at the same time with deep tremolos and arpeggios (this is the earlier version of a transcription which was later modified slightly for the collection of twelve transcriptions, S558); Die Forelle (‘The Trout’, D550d), is given in its later, somewhat simplified and totally recast second transcription, still with one extra variation of the melody before the denouement of the poem has the fish hooked. And finally here are Liszt’s last thoughts on Ständchen (‘Leise flehen meine Lieder’) (‘Serenade—Gently imploring go my songs’, D957/4) from Schwanengesang, effectively his fourth version of it—he had first issued a transcription of it long before he set about preparing the whole of the collection, effectively in two complete versions. In his last years he added to the second version a new cadenza at the coda for his student and biographer, Lina Ramann, further underlining the sense of the closing lines: ‘Bebend harr ich dir entgegen! Komm, beglücke mich!’ (‘Trembling, I await your approach! Come, bring me joy!’).

Schwanengesang—Vierzehn Lieder von Franz Schubert is a triumph of the transcriber’s art, which matches in its way the depth and breadth of this wonderful collection of Schubert’s last songs. The originals, D957—seven songs to poems by Rellstab, six to Heine (all composed in August, 1828) and one to Seidl (composed around the same time as the famous Der Hirt auf dem Felsen (‘The Shepherd on the Rock’) in October 1828 and therefore Schubert’s last song for voice and piano)—were collected and published in 1829. Although Schubert did not intend them to form a cycle, they are usually so performed, in a fairly arbitrary order which neatly separates the poets. But there is something uncomfortable about ending with such an un-valedictory piece as Die Taubenpost, especially hard on the heels of Der Doppelgänger, and although Liszt preserves the juxtaposition of these two, he does not hesitate to return to a minor key to complete his cycle, and to choose a different order for the other songs.

Liszt’s pieces correspond to numbers 11, 10, 5, 12, 7, 6, 4, 9, 3, 1, 8, 13, 14 and 2 of the published order of the songs, giving him another interesting key structure of C minor, A flat major, E minor, C major, E flat major, B minor, D minor, B flat minor, B flat major, G major, G minor. B minor, G major and C minor—all Schubert’s original keys. Every transcription has whole passages given in alternative text, thus forming a possible second version of the whole cycle (see Volume 33), but here the main text is given throughout.

The mysterious arpeggios of Die Stadt (‘The Town’) make an excellent and unsettling beginning to Liszt’s cycle, and his interpretation of the second verse (‘Ein feuchter Windzug kräuselt die graue Wasserbahn’—‘A dank breeze ruffles the grey waterway’), reinforces the song’s reference to the lost loved one. Das Fischermädchen (‘The Fisher-maiden’) is a straightforward transcription with an extra final verse mirroring the ‘Ebb’ und Flut’ (‘ebb and flow’) of the text with its delicate fluttering between major and minor. The grief-stricken poet’s Aufenthalt (‘Resting Place’) can only be rushing river, roaring forest or inflexible rock—and Liszt’s response is full of clever word-painting.

Am Meer tells, by the sea in the twilight, of love lost, and of the poet’s being poisoned by the tears which he has drunk away from the hand of the unhappy woman whom he loves. Liszt’s tremolos correspond exactly to Schubert’s and he conjures the mood perfectly. Abschied (‘Farewell’) is a marvellous piece of enforced jollity at parting, brilliantly set by Schubert and well captured by Liszt, who adds his usual musical commentary upon the text to make a lively set of variations with much jumping about in triplets.

In der Ferne (‘Far Away’) describes the bleak, unblessed state of those who abandon what and whom they love to wander unfulfilled, finally revealing that it is the poet himself telling the lover that broke his heart of his decision to flee. Liszt’s mighty transcription, subtitled ‘Lamentation’, pierces the heart of both words and music. In Ständchen Liszt famously permits himself to set the whole of the third and fourth verses of the melody, and the right hand of the accompaniment, in canon, without doing any damage thereby. Liszt removes the last chord in his otherwise very straightforward transcription of Ihr Bild (‘Her Portrait’)—a dream that a picture of the poet’s lost lover came to life—in order to proceed directly to Frühlingssehnsucht (‘Longing in Spring’) in which Liszt reflects the poet’s impatience for love in the spring with reckless hand-crossing and leaps across the keyboard.

Liebesbotschaft (‘Message of Love’) is one of the happier songs of the cycle. Liszt manages to include Schubert’s constant demisemiquavers, which represent the rushing brooklet carrying greetings to the poet’s loved one. Liszt moves the vocal line from tenor to soprano (in tenths) between the verses. In Der Atlas the poet likens the burden of a lover’s sorrow to the weight of the world borne by Atlas, and blames his heart’s will. Liszt varies Schubert’s tremolo accompaniment at the beginning with patterns of six semiquavers—slightly alarming in its unfamiliarity at first, but more effective in retrospect to save the demisemiquavers for the end.

In Der Doppelgänger (‘The Double’) the poet sees a vision of himself outside the house where his lost love once lived. Schubert’s terrifying song has such a starkly simple texture that Liszt is loth to do much other than to broaden the chords to compensate the lack of the voice. Die Taubenpost (‘The Pigeon-post’) is a joyful contrast to the lonely misery of the previous piece. The poet’s happy conceit likens his longing to a faithful carrier-pigeon which will never misdeliver a message of faithful love, and Liszt decorates the text with the most felicitous coruscation. Kriegers Ahnung (‘Soldier’s Foreboding’) returns us to the fear of love’s separation, with a soldier by the campfire afraid for the future of his life and love. Liszt makes a virtual symphonic poem of the piece by providing textures that express exactly a troubled mind before sleep comes at last with the happier thoughts of the distant beloved.

The second disc closes with two rarities: Frühlingsglaube, D686c (‘Spring Faith’—as nature changes in spring, so must all things, but to the good), appears in a similar transcription in the Zwölf Lieder, S558. This earlier version contains a beautiful alternative reading for the second verse (given here) which was unaccountably deleted later. The so-called ‘Troisième Edition’ of the Marche hongroise was made by a complicated cobbling together of the first edition (as in Mélodies hongroises—see Volume 31), and of the second Diabelli Edition (as in Ungarische Melodien in this volume) with a new introduction and several new interludes as well as many alterations of texture, all of which adapt the spirit of the old Liszt to the music of his youth.

What a pity that Liszt did not transcribe the whole cycle of Winterreise! His Zwölf Lieder von Franz Schubert—[aus] Winterreise (‘Twelve songs of Franz Schubert—[from] Winter’s Journey’) are of exactly the same fine quality as his Schwanengesang transcriptions, and to have only half the cycle is tantalizing, even though the selection and arrangement of it has its own story to tell.

This is not the place to go too deeply into the history of the original Schubert cycle, D911, but it was composed in two bursts of creativity in 1827, to poems by the same Wilhelm Müller whose texts inform Die schöne Müllerin. There are those who argue that, by the time the second book of these songs was written, Schubert should have re-ordered them in line with the order of the original poems. David Owen Norris has also argued for re-ordering the Liszt transcriptions along similar lines. The cleverness of the modern compact disc player will allow the gentle listener to experiment at will, but here the transcriptions are given as Liszt published them, and they comprise numbers 1, 23, 22, 13, 4, 6, 5, 24, 19, 21, 18 and 17 of Schubert’s cycle. Liszt’s key structure is typically interesting: D minor, B flat major (Schubert has A major), G minor, E flat major, C minor, E minor (Schubert has F sharp minor), E major, A minor, A major, F major and D minor/D major/D minor. Like the Schwanengesang transcriptions, Liszt furnished alternative readings, but in this case only for five of the songs (see Volume 33).

Liszt begins his journey as does Schubert, with the uncannily imaginative walking song Gute Nacht (‘Goodnight’), eliminating the penultimate verse and treating the piece as a theme and variations. As so often, the poet’s theme is that of love rejected, and Liszt contributes with skilful word-painting in his choice of fragile textures to depict the Mondenschatten (‘shadow in the moonlight’) and the undisturbed dreams of the beloved being left behind. In Die Nebensonnen (‘Mock Suns’) Liszt takes Schubert’s song in one verse and extends it into a dramatic narrative that truly reflects the emotional compass of this prickly poem: the conceit of an optical illusion of three suns representing the poet’s failure in human relationships. Liszt treats Mut (‘Courage’) with appropriately festive decoration (and eliminates the reprise of the introduction at the coda), merrily facing with Müller and Schubert the world’s squalls.

In Die Post the poet has an involuntary leaping of the heart at the sound of the posthorn presaging mail from the town where he once had a true love, knowing that there will be no post for him. Liszt’s setting is straightforward, with one or two musical sighs added, and a splendid self-mocking clatter at the coda. Erstarrung (‘Numbness’) finds the poet in pain at his loss. Nature, like his heart, is frozen, but if it should melt, then so would his inner image of his love in his as-dead heart. Liszt deliberately begins tentatively, with the melody slightly displaced from the beat, but as the song’s anguish mounts he becomes forthright and impassioned. In Wasserflut (‘Floodwaters’) the poet speaks to the snow of the fate of his falling tears in a thaw: when the floodwaters pass his beloved’s house his tears will glow. Schubert sets this most introspectively, and Liszt follows him to the letter. Der Lindenbaum (‘The Linden Tree’) is the poet’s solace, his sheet-anchor in times good and bad, and finally a recollected place of peace. Liszt applies an astonishing armoury of delicate effects, especially with trills, to conjure both the rustling of the leaves and the tree’s innate tranquillity.

For those who know the song-cycle well, it comes as rather a surprise to encounter Der Leiermann (‘The Organ Grinder’) anywhere but at the end, where the poet’s disillusion becomes complete. But Liszt sees a good juxtaposition with the next song and treats this one as a simple introduction, moving without pause to the false attraction (so beautifully captured by both Schubert and Liszt) of Täuschung (‘Delusion’), in which the poet imagines briefly that a friendly light will lead him out of his cold wanderings into warmth and even into love. Das Wirtshaus (‘The Wayside Inn’) is really a graveyard, where the poet is ready to lie down, but his time is not come and he must move on. Liszt sustains the still slowness of Schubert’s masterpiece with a remarkable variety of textures, finally allowing himself tremolos and trills to underline the misery of rest denied.

To close, Liszt allows his robust transcription of Der stürmische Morgen (‘The Stormy Morning’—the poet sees the foul weather as a reflection of his heart and mind) to be played before and after Im Dorfe (‘In the Village’): the poet may not linger amongst the sleeping villagers, who are able to refresh themselves in dreams. Liszt’s transcription is, if it were possible, even more touching in its tranquillity than the original, and the wrench back to the reality of life’s storms is the solution to his own personal life’s journey.

When Liszt issued his Sechs Melodien von Franz Schubert in 1844, he was as unaware as most of the musical world at the time that the first song which he transcribed was a misattribution to Schubert. The piece is nevertheless offered here to keep Liszt’s collection intact, and the obscurity into which it would fall if listed as a song by its true author is reason enough to preserve its quite Schubertian beauty in the noble context which Liszt intended. Lebe wohl! (‘Fare well!’) was composed by Hans von Weyrauch, who was born, as the excellent Neue Liszt-Ausgabe informs us, in 1788, and who wrote the song as Nach Osten! (‘To the East!’) in 1824, but it was reissued in 1843 with new words (by Branger) as Adieu and translated as ‘Lebe wohl!’ under Schubert’s name. (It is still published by Schirmer in one of their collections of Schubert Songs!) The simple text bids farewell to a dead loved one, and Liszt’s transcription retains simplicity, even though the texture of the accompaniment is greatly varied over the two verses of the song. The Schiller song Des Mädchens Klage (‘The Maiden’s Lament’, D191b) brings us to Schubert proper, and a complex transcription cast as a theme and variations dramatically depicting the maiden’s discovery, having lived and loved a little, that sorrow and tears follow hard on the heels of joy. Das Zügenglöcklein, D871b—the title which Liszt knew, Das Sterbeglöcklein, amounts to the same thing—is a strophic prayer for the unknown dead being tolled by a distant bell. Again Liszt sets the work as a theme and variations of great refinement and intricacy. Trockne Blumen (‘Dried Flowers’, D795/18) comes from Die schöne Müllerin. The poet speaks to a few dead flowers which were the only gift he had had from his beloved. If the flowers were buried in his grave, and if she realized that his feelings had been true, then the flowers would spring to life again. Liszt’s arrangement (in C minor, rather than Schubert’s E minor) is quite straightforward, and the hope of the second part of the song is accentuated by his placing the material octaves higher than the original. Ungeduld, D795/7 is also from Schwanengesang and is Liszt’s first transcription of the piece (in F major rather than Schubert’s A major) and, like the second transcription, is a theme and variations one verse shorter than the original. Curiously, it approches the business of conveying the poet’s impatient passion in quite a different way from the later transcription, and adds a short, extremely blue. coda. Finally, Die Forelle, D550d, is given a full-blooded concert transcription.

By way of an encore, this set ends with yet another version of the Marche hongroise, the one reprinted by the Russian State Music Publishers, presumably taken from the early Richault edition in which Liszt revised many small details and added extra ossia passages which are included here to give the broadest variety of all his many efforts towards this one work.

Leslie Howard © 1995


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Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 23 – Harold in Italy
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 24 – Beethoven & Hummel Septets' (CDA66761/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 24 – Beethoven & Hummel Septets
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 25 – The Canticle of the Sun' (CDA66694)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 25 – The Canticle of the Sun
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 26 – The Young Liszt' (CDA66771/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 26 – The Young Liszt
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 27 – Fantasies, paraphrases and transcriptions of National Songs' (CDA66787)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 27 – Fantasies, paraphrases and transcriptions of National Songs
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 28 – Dances and Marches' (CDA66811/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 28 – Dances and Marches
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 29 – Magyar Dalok & Magyar Rapszódiák' (CDA66851/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 29 – Magyar Dalok & Magyar Rapszódiák
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 30 – Liszt at the Opera III' (CDA66861/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 30 – Liszt at the Opera III
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 31 – The Schubert Transcriptions I' (CDA66951/3)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 31 – The Schubert Transcriptions I
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 33 – The Schubert Transcriptions III' (CDA66957/9)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 33 – The Schubert Transcriptions III
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 34 – Douze Grandes Études' (CDA66973)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 34 – Douze Grandes Études
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 35 – Arabesques' (CDA66984)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 35 – Arabesques
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 36 – Excelsior!' (CDA66995)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 36 – Excelsior!
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 37 – Tanzmomente' (CDA67004)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 37 – Tanzmomente
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 38 – Les Préludes' (CDA67015)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 38 – Les Préludes
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 39 – Première année de pèlerinage' (CDA67026)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 39 – Première année de pèlerinage
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 40 – Gaudeamus igitur' (CDA67034)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 40 – Gaudeamus igitur
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 41 – The Recitations with piano' (CDA67045)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 41 – The Recitations with piano
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 42 – Liszt at the Opera IV' (CDA67101/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 42 – Liszt at the Opera IV
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 43 – Deuxième Année de Pèlerinage' (CDA67107)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 43 – Deuxième Année de Pèlerinage
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 44 – The Early Beethoven Transcriptions' (CDA67111/3)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 44 – The Early Beethoven Transcriptions
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 45 – Rapsodie espagnole' (CDA67145)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 45 – Rapsodie espagnole
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 46 – Meditations' (CDA67161/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 46 – Meditations
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 47 – Litanies de Marie' (CDA67187)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 47 – Litanies de Marie
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 48 – The Complete Paganini Études' (CDA67193)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 48 – The Complete Paganini Études
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 49 – Schubert and Weber Transcriptions' (CDA67203)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 49 – Schubert and Weber Transcriptions
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 50 – Liszt at the Opera V' (CDA67231/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 50 – Liszt at the Opera V
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 51 – Paralipomènes' (CDA67233/4)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 51 – Paralipomènes
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 52 – Ungarischer Romanzero' (CDA67235)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 52 – Ungarischer Romanzero
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 53 – Music for piano & orchestra I' (CDA67401/2)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 53 – Music for piano & orchestra I
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 53 – Music for piano & orchestra II' (CDA67403/4)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 53 – Music for piano & orchestra II
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 54 – Liszt at the Opera VI' (CDA67406/7)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 54 – Liszt at the Opera VI
'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 55 – Grande Fantaisie' (CDA67408/10)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 55 – Grande Fantaisie
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 56 – Rarities, Curiosities, Album Leaves and Fragments' (CDA67414/7)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 56 – Rarities, Curiosities, Album Leaves and Fragments
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'Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 57 – Hungarian Rhapsodies' (CDA67418/9)
Liszt: The complete music for solo piano, Vol. 57 – Hungarian Rhapsodies
'Liszt: Piano Music' (LISZT1)
Liszt: Piano Music
MP3 £4.50FLAC £4.50ALAC £4.50 LISZT1  2CDs Super-budget price sampler — Deleted  
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