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Hyperion Records

CDA66949 - Huss & Schelling: Piano Concertos
CDA66949

Recording details: January 1997
Henry Wood Hall, Glasgow, Scotland
Produced by Amanda Hurton
Engineered by Tryggvi Tryggvason
Release date: October 1997
DISCID: 5D0E4D07
Total duration: 59 minutes 58 seconds

'Compelling listening' (Gramophone)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Huss & Schelling: Piano Concertos
Allegro maestoso  [14'01]
Allegro marziale  [10'22]
Intermezzo  [7'55]

It is all-but forgotten that before the arrival of those composers whom we now think of as quintessentially American (from Ives onwards) there was thriving group composing in the USA who had studied in Europe and transferred its traditions to their homeland. It is to this school that Huss and Schelling belong.

The Huss Concerto is written on the grandest scale and makes great virtuoso demands on the performer (think of it as an American 'Brahms' concerto). Its lack of success is perhaps partly due to the mediocre pianistic talents of the composer; though he did play the work these performances were apparently sad occasions!

As befits its title, the Schelling 'Suite' is most more light-weight (think of Moszkowski or Paderewski, the latter a great friend of Schelling). It was written to charm and entertain. The Finale is particularly memorable, being a pot-pourri of American themes—Dixie, Way down upon the Swanee River, and Yankee Doodle.


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Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
The name of Ernest Henry Schelling (1876–1939) is marginally better known than that of Henry Holden Huss (1862–1953). However, neither one of them has pricked the consciousness of the modern musical world, neither is listed in most musical dictionaries, and each merits only a short paragraph in the latest Grove. The fact that each wrote an effective, colourful and well-orchestrated virtuoso concert work for piano should surely give comfort to those who thought that America’s reputation in that era fell entirely to Edward MacDowell. This recording represents the first foray into Americana in Hyperion’s ongoing Romantic Piano Concerto series.

Although it appears that these two composers’ paths did not cross, they did share certain characteristics. Each exhibited prodigious musical talent very early on, Huss as a composer of songs and hymns, and Schelling as a wunderkind virtuoso kissed by Brahms. They were both distinctly ‘nineteenth-century’ in their outlooks and this may, in some measure, explain their ephemeral reputations. The Boston Symphony Orchestra seems to have been an important catalyst for their careers: Huss’s two major piano-and-orchestra works were premiered by the BSO, as were Schelling’s Impressions from an Artist’s Life (1913) for piano and his Violin Concerto (introduced by Fritz Kreisler in 1916).

Huss (pronounced ‘Hoos’) claimed to be a descendent of Jan Hus (1373–1415), the Bohemian preacher. More easily proven is his German ancestry from the eighteenth century, culminating in the composer’s father George (1828–1904), who emigrated to the United States fourteen years before Henry Holden’s birth in 1862. As soon as the composer became serious about composition, he returned to the land of his heritage to study at the Munich Royal Conservatory with Rheinberger, the organist and composer. Rheinberger was an exacting and inspiring teacher of all elements of counterpoint and improvisation, and Huss received an exhaustive musical education. He also studied piano with Joseph Giehrl, a pupil of Liszt.

The quality of Huss’s abilities as a performer is open to speculation. Some critics praised the polish of his playing. In the early days of 1886 Louis Mass wrote, in the Musical Courier of 10 November, about Huss’s performance of his Rhapsody, Op 3: ‘The piano part was well played by the composer, and the work received a flattering reception’ 1. However, the critic from the New York Times wrote of this same concert: ‘The composition suffered severely at the hands of its writer. Mr Huss is a pianist of the somnolescent school and should hereafter entrust the performance of his music to someone with more ability as an executive musician’ 2. During Tchaikovsky’s visit to New York in 1891 Huss was asked to play the piano part in the A minor Trio, and he wrote about the experience of playing this for Tchaikovsky in his notes some forty years later:

Tchaikovsky came to the rehearsal and was graciousness itself. His autograph on my copy is a treasured souvenir. As I remember it after a lapse of 40 years, about his only criticism was that a certain theme might be taken a little slower.

It is amusing to note that Tchaikovsky’s own account of this event is somewhat different. His diary entry of 20 May 1891 reads as follows:

The Quartet was played rather poorly and the Trio even worse, for the pianist (Mr Huss, modest and cowardly) is quite inferior and can’t even count.

In his definitive study of Huss, Henry Holden Huss: An American Composer’s Life, Gary A Greene examines the composer’s entire oeuvre, encompassing chamber, orchestral, choral, vocal and instrumental compositions. Greene concludes that the Piano Concerto stands out from the rest in terms of its scope, success and individuality. Its key, B major, is, to my knowledge, unique in the piano concerto genre. There are, of course, well-known examples which visit B major (Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’) or end up in it, but the choice of this key as the home-base, as it were, indicates, perhaps, a model not in the virtuoso past but in the exotic world of Wagnerian music-drama. In his teen years, Huss discussed Wagner at length with MacDowell in their correspondence and later, before the composition of the concerto, he participated in a lecture series on Wagner. The glorious B major of the Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde finds grandiose echoes in the admittedly less elevated score of Huss’s Concerto, and his harmonic progressions are often distinctly Wagnerian.

The Piano Concerto in B major is in three movements. The first movement is on a very large scale and could stand by itself (in the manner of the Grieg or Tchaikovsky’s First—Huss dedicated his Concerto to Adele aus der Ohe, a noted interpreter of Tchaikovsky’s B flat minor work). The piano writing in this movement is highly derivative. In addition to the two forementioned, one hears snatches of Brahms, Liszt, and even Godowsky in the cadenza. There is a shameless, possibly tongue-in-cheek, crib at the recapitulation from a similar spot in Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’. The slow movement is more original, if less memorable, and is in the enharmonically altered mediant of E flat major. B and E flat are used throughout the work as pivotal keys (Huss knew his Beethoven); Huss employs the device that Rachmaninov was to use later in his Second Piano Concerto, connecting the movements by modulatory passages from tonic to mediant and back again. The Finale is a showy scherzo-valse with a number of more gentle diversionary episodes. The available orchestral score breaks off at one point during an accompanied cadenza, so I was obliged to orchestrate a short section, following very closely Huss’s instructions in the two-piano score. The first movement’s powerful main theme reappears at the climax of the third, and heralds a wild dash to the conclusion.

Gillespie’s Bibliography of American Piano Music describes the piece as an ‘extremely difficult, lushly romantic composition’. It is certainly conservative in many ways and lifts itself above the ordinary by the virtuosity of its figuration rather than the momentousness of its material.

When Ernest Schelling was born, the Romantic Age in music was drawing to a close. Wagner, Liszt, Tchaikovsky and Brahms were still alive. Schelling was an extraordinary musical prodigy who made his debut as a pianist at the Philadelphia Academy of Music when he was four years old. He was born of an English mother, Rose White Wilkes of Cambridge, and Felix Emmanuel Schelling, a physician and philosopher of Swiss origin and also the boy’s first teacher.

At the age of seven Ernest was admitted to the Paris Conservatoire as its youngest ever pupil; he studied with Mathias (a pupil of Chopin) and many of Europe’s leading performers and pedagogues, including Philipp, Leschetizky, Huber and Moszkowski, giving concerts throughout Europe—from Paris to St Petersburg—all before he was sixteen. Due to this intensive schedule he developed neuritis and despaired of the future. Fortuitously he was heard by Paderewski who was so impressed that he took Schelling as his only American pupil from 1898 to 1902.

Schelling established himself by 1905 as a mature virtuoso and enjoyed a fine reputation as a pianist. He also developed his conducting skills as Music Director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and as conductor of the Young Peoples’ Concerts for the New York Philharmonic. These Young Peoples’ Concerts embodied Schelling’s commitment to bringing the enjoyment of music to children all over the world. He pioneeringly illustrated the concerts with large-format glass lantern slides projected onto a screen, achieving a kind of Pied Piper status. A commemorative bust now stands in Carnegie Hall, placed in gratitude for this work with the young.

Schelling left two major works for piano and orchestra: the Suite Fantastique (1905/6) and Impressions from an Artist’s Life. The Suite was particularly successful in Europe, being premiered by the Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam (with the composer playing and Mengelberg conducting) in 1907, and being later performed by the Berlin Philharmonic and a host of other orchestras across the continent. It was also played frequently by Moiseiwitsch who performed it at the Proms with Henry Wood conducting. It is an eclectic work, much lighter in vein than Huss’s Concerto, consisting of four movements of differing characters. The first is ‘à la hongroise’ in F sharp minor, with gypsy freedom and flavour. The punctuations in the orchestra are reminiscent of the slow lassu dance from the czárdás. Schelling’s unusually large orchestra includes two harps and tambourine. The piano style is assured and brilliant, as much in the fast passage-work as in the opening coruscating cadenzas. The second movement is pure Moszkowski, its cheerfulness overflowing into the Christmassy trio (in 5/4 time). The Intermezzo, in D flat major, is redolent of the slow movement from Dvorák’s ‘New World’ Symphony in its folk-like lyricism and instrumentation. In the cadenza Schelling makes use of impressionistic glissandos and arpeggios that are positively Ravelian.

The Finale, ‘Virginia Reel’ in G flat major, must have come as a delightful surprise to those early European audiences. Schelling had written of the Suite as a whole:

This was composed while I was studying in Europe and very homesick for America. It is for that reason that I included in the last movement, the Virginia Reel, ‘Dixie’, ‘Way down upon the Swanee River’, and ‘Yankee Doodle’. In that work I wanted to give forth the energy, vitality, and life of America.

At the mid-point of the movement the piano, imitating a banjo, delivers ‘Dixie’ deadpan while the strings, in harmonics, render a heart-on-sleeve version of ‘The Swanee River’ simultaneously. Not all is special effect, though, and the Finale as a whole is powerful and exhilarating.

When Ernest Schelling died suddenly in December 1939 more than a thousand mourners attended his funeral including a host of colleagues such as Yehudi Menuhin, John Barbirolli, Mrs Fritz Kreisler and Mrs Edward MacDowell; he was to have been conducting that very day. A telegram from Paderewski was read to the Carnegie Hall children’s audience:

Words cannot describe my deep sorrow in losing my dearest friend. He was taken from our love at a climax of his splendid career, leaving unfinished many of his works, depriving us untimely of admiring his rich talent. In the history of American music the name of Ernest Schelling will be given the outstanding place it certainly deserves.

Ironically, it may be true that Huss and Schelling fell into relative obscurity not because their styles were considered unduly conservative but because they were American composers when it was unfashionable to be such. The next generation of Americans had the new century, the phonograph and the tide of Stravinskian modernism to help them establish a beach-head. Nowadays, when lesser-known romantic music is enjoying a renaissance, let us hope that these two Americans can be revivified. Their piano works may not compare with the greatest, but in craftsmanship, orchestration, architecture and, yes, inspiration, they hold up remarkably well to their counterparts from the rest of the world.

Ian Hobson © 1997


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