Hyperion Records

Artist Hyperion Records
Boston Baroque
© Julian Bullitt

Boston Baroque

Boston Baroque is the first permanent Baroque orchestra established in North America, and is widely regarded as ‘one of the world’s premier period-instrument bands’ (Fanfare). Founded in 1973 by Music Director Martin Pearlman, the Boston Baroque orchestra is made up of some of the finest period-instrument players in the USA; they are frequently joined by the ensemble’s professional chorus and by instrumental and vocal soloists from around the world. The ensemble presents an annual subscription series at New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall in Boston and Harvard University’s Sanders Theatre in Cambridge plus additional concerts at other venues.

Boston Baroque’s many career milestones include the American premiere of Rameau’s Zoroastre; a Mozart opera series including Marriage of Figaro, Così fan tutte, and the American period-instrument premieres of Mozart’s Don Giovanni and The Magic Flute; and the Beethoven symphonies.

In 1998–99, the ensemble gave the modern premiere of The Philosopher’s Stone, a singspiel newly discovered to include music by Mozart and to shed fresh light on his canon. In recent years, Boston Baroque has presented a cycle of the surviving operas of Monteverdi, which includes new performing editions of L’incoronazione di Poppea and Il ritorno d’Ulisse by Martin Pearlman; an internationally praised series of Handel operas including Agrippina, Alcina, Xerxes, Giulio Cesare, Semele, and Amadigi di Gaula; and, most recently, an acclaimed account of Rameau’s opera Les Indes galantes.

Boston Baroque has performed at major American music centers, such as Los Angeles’ Disney Hall, New York’s Carnegie Hall and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and festivals at Ravinia and Tanglewood; and the ensemble was the first period-instrument ensemble to be invited to participate at the Casals Festival in Puerto Rico. The ensemble made its European debut in 2003, performing Handel’s Messiah in Krakow and Warsaw, Poland. In reviews of the Monteverdi Vespers at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in 2010, the New York Times called the performance ‘vital and ebullient’ and Opera News said that it was ‘an experience not soon to be forgotten.’

Boston Baroque reaches an international audience with its critically acclaimed recordings, of which Fanfare wrote ‘each one is an incomparable gem’. It is heard by millions on classical radio stations in North America and Europe. Three Boston Baroque recordings have been finalists for Grammy Awards: Handel’s Messiah (1992); Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610 (1998); and Bach’s Mass in B Minor (2000).

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